Applications are now open for the METRO Accelerator for Hospitality, Powered by Techstars

In 2015 and 2016, Techstars ran the first two programs focused on hospitality with our partner, METRO, Europe’s largest wholesaler to restaurants and hotels.

The 21 companies that went through the programs have now raised over $50 million in capital. While this is very exciting, we are anticipating another benefit that we think can add serious value to startups: lead generation.

Over the last year, METRO has quietly been building up the Horeca.Digital unit. This subsidiary markets digital solutions to restaurants and hotels across five countries in Europe (Germany, France, Austria, Italy, and Spain). In those five countries, there is a dedicated sales force that does nothing but market digital products.

Now, every startup that goes through the METRO Accelerator for Hospitality, Powered by Techstars has the opportunity to run a pilot with Horeca.Digital. In this pilot, we test lead generation of the product with the Horeca.Digital sales force. If successful, there is potential for a multi-year lead generation agreement.

Over the last month, Horeca.Digital has delivered over 1,000 warm leads to one startup with which they have just signed a deal. Now this company has been scrambling to hire salespeople. What a problem to have!

If you run a startup where your product is aimed towards restaurants or hotels, you should apply for this program. Here are the details of what you’ll receive:

  • An offer of 120.000€ of investment
  • Mentorship from and access to key METRO and Techstars executives and leaders, other hospitality industry leaders, venture capitalists, and experienced entrepreneur
  • An opportunity to test with METRO lead generation of your product to restaurants or hotels in one country (Germany, France, Austria, Italy, or Spain)
  • Free dedicated working space in the heart of Berlin for the duration of the program
  • A Demo Day in December 2017, where each team will present their company and product to hundreds of investors
  • The chance to become a member of the METRO and Techstars alumni network for life

If you are interested in joining the METRO Accelerator for Hospitality, Powered by Techstars, apply before the final deadline on June 18th. If you apply before April 30th, we will be able to help give you feedback on your application.








Getting Funded Advice Just Works For Those Getting Funded, Anyway

There is no shortage of advice on how to get funded – Lots and lots of sophisticated advice.

Does it work? Yes.

Does it work for everyone? No.

For whom does it work then? It helps investable companies to get funded.

I have now invested in 27 startups over the last few years. Admittedly, we live in a great funding environment.

In all these investments, I have only seen a single company that should have been funded fail to raise. All other well performing companies raised a round. And in addition, a few that may have been less deserving.

The reason? Angel and VC investors by now are pretty experienced when it comes to picking companies. There are more active investors than high quality startups – the good ones get funded.

When we launch an accelerator program, I say the same thing to all founders: it is not my job to get you investors. It is my job to help you build an investable company. Once you have that, you should be able to raise the capital you need.

How do you build an investable company? 

In my experience, founders go through some stages:

  • Idea and first customers
  • Insight and more customers to validate insight
  • Building a marketing, sales, product, etc. machinery
  • Building out the business

Each time, when you progress from one stage to the next, you become more investable. More progression, more investable, etc.

Now you know why it is called an accelerator. We work with companies to accelerate them to the next stage.

 

Demo Day E-6

www.metroaccelerator.com is focused specifically on those startups that have a focus on hospitality and food tech.








METRO Accelerator, Three Months In

Over the last three months with the METRO Accelerator, I have talked to 100+ founding CEOs and hundreds have already applied for the program.

What I am looking for is simple: Great founders who have tangible insight into their market.

I am becoming really excited because this is what I am finding:

  • Online restaurants focused in specific foods and highly scalable cooking and delivery options
  • Very low cost and marketable SAAS solutions
  • Staffing solutions for hospitality businesses,
  • Startups simplifying the supply chain for restaurants
  • In restaurant / venue ordering solutions
  • Mobile apps where restaurants can pull in physical customers
  • New types of customer care software, e.g. Bots for hospitality
  • Entirely new types of food

These are companies with experienced serial entrepreneurs, founders who have experience with high-growth startups, as well as complete first timers. In most cases, these teams have worked together for more than one year, all with real insights into their customers, products in the market and working on growing their businesses.

When I started three months ago, I didn’t know what to expect. Last year, we found a large number of startups at the idea stage. Now, we are seeing far more startups that have initially validated their market and are working on building a scalable marketing and sales machinery. That is actually a great match with what METRO is looking for.

If what I have already seen is an indicator of what else I will find, then I am super stoked.

Don’t be shy reaching out, you don’t need to get a warm intro to talk to us.

Start an application here and you will hear from us pretty swiftly.

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Startup Success: Why Everything Must Work Out In Your Favor

Last week I talked to a young, first time founder. Before we even talked about Techstars, he said, “You know what, we have raised a little bit of cash, we have a good advisor, we are probably okay, we don’t need an accelerator.”

You cannot imagine how much I cringe when I hear that kind of statement.

It is very difficult for me to convey to first time founders what lies ahead of them. Indeed, if they knew, they wouldn’t do it. “You don’t know what you don’t know.”

Building a successful startup is incredibly difficult. The reason is this: In order to build a great startup, EVERYTHING has to work out for you. EVERYTHING.

The CEO, the team, the market, the business model, the pricing, the marketing, the sales, the customer success, the design, the engineering, finance, HR, recruitment, culture, your investors, your board, your advisors, your competitors must screw up, the world changes in ways favorable to you, the tech stacks shift in your favor. And more. EVERYTHING.

If only ONE of those things goes really wrong, you will likely shut down. ONE key aspect wrong, company likely dead. You need to master ALL of them. And if you want to build a world class company, all of these better be world class.

That is very, very hard.

The question every founder needs to ask themselves is whether they think they are world class at those things. Do you know what it takes to be world class? Do you know how to recognize it? Where would you find those kind of people? How would you hire people who are? Which ones do you hire first? How much do you spend? Could you even afford any of them? What would you do with them once you hired them?

I am now 40 years old. I have been involved with startups for the last dozen years or so. I can tell you one thing with total conviction:

If I were doing another startup, I would try to get the best possible people around me. There are so many things that I don’t know and so many things I am not good at, and definitely not world class in many of them. The only way to overcome this is having incredible people around me. As many and as early as possible.

In this context, think again about a world class accelerator. In that accelerator, you of course get some cash, but here is what you really get:

An advisory team of 100+ mentors, access to a global network of thousands of founders who are on your side, the accelerator staff, the LPs in their funds, the corporate partners, the sponsors, the companies who provide perks and everybody else who is involved. They all work for the startups, because they want to, not because they get paid to do it.

I wish accelerators had existed 10 years ago. It is the primary reason I do what I do right now. It is the reason why the Managing Directors at Techstars do what they do. We do this, because we wish somebody had done it for us.

I personally think that getting everything I describe above for 6% founder equity is most likely the best way to spend less than 1/3 of a 20% option pool one could ever imagine. Maybe I am wrong. But then the startups I have been involved with had up to $300m annual revenue and 500+ staff. The best CEOs of these startups had the best advisors and mentors very early on.

Something to think about.

Applications are now open for the METRO Accelerator, powered by Techstars. Apply here!

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Applications Now Open for the METRO Accelerator in Berlin

Last year we announced the launch of the inaugural class of the METRO Accelerator.

One year later we look back on the 11 companies of the first class who have made enormous progress in a relatively short period of time. We are grateful to our mentors who have helped these companies, coached them, become customers or have invested in them. Thank you!

What impressed us most about the engagement with METRO in 2015 was the breadth and depth of its connections in the industry. METRO is connected to the food industry in 27 countries and its engagement with the founders in helping them build their companies was powerful and impressive.

If your startup is looking for traction in the food or hospitality industries, then the METRO Accelerator is for you.

It is with great pleasure that we announce today that applications are open for the second class of the METRO Accelerator in Berlin!

Hospitality and food tech startups from anywhere in the world can apply, regardless of whether you have already raised a Series A round or whether you are an experienced team starting to work on your next venture.

Applications will remain open until June 20, 2016. The program will begin on September 12 and Demo Day will be on December 7.

The program will take place in the heart of Berlin and will be run entirely in English. As with all Techstars programs, we invest €120k into each of the ten startups who will streamline and improve the way hotels, restaurants and catering companies work.

Metro Accelerator, Powered by Techstars: Creating an unfair advantage for Hospitality and Food tech startups!

Learn more and apply today!

 








The B2B Sale: Do the Math

I have some 20+ mentoring calls with founders each week. Many of them pitch me B2B ideas. Many of those ideas don’t work for one simple reason.

Math.

I think there are three B2B products that make sense.

1. Single decision maker

A single individual makes the purchasing decision. For example to use Buffer to manage social media. Typically these purchase decision are made by swiping a card and expensing it later. The price point here is $10s -$100s per month.

2. Department decision

You sell to a department. Say you are selling HR software. Or IT software. Or finance software. Several people can be involved a senior person / the department head will make the decision. You will send them an invoice and they will pay. The price point here is typically $100s — $1000s per month

3. Company wide decision

Multiple department heads are involved. The MD / CEO will make the purchasing decision. Long drawn out sales cycle and implementation processes are typical. Price point is typically $10,000s — $100,000s per month.

A good B2B business is typically priced in these bands, because the effort to market, sell and integrate the product with the customer means that unless products are priced at this level, they cannot be sold profitably.

So, when founder comes to me and pitches me a product that a CEO needs to approve that costs hundreds per month, then this leads to a short mentoring call where I would advise the founder to rethink what they do.

Do the math — your business is driven by it.








How to Write an Investor Update Email

I have several dozen portfolio companies. Most of them send me monthly or quarterly updates. There are three items in the updates that I personally find more useful than anything else. They are:

  1. Cash flow / P&L top line summary
  2. Major changes / developments
  3. Problems the CEO is struggling with and wants help on

A hypothetical example is below. I wish all my update emails were like it. Call it the minimum viable update email.

============

Hi Investors,

Last month we burned through $45k. We are on track to turn cash flow positive before year end. We will decide in about three months whether we need a little bit of extra cash for working capital purposes or not.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 9.23.36 AM

There were no key changes last month. We have got two good candidates for CMO and will decide this month.

Key problems:

  1. We have some problems in our tech team. Our CTO isn’t experienced enough to manage through this. Can you recommend a mentor / experienced CTO to come in and help (this can be a paid coaching position)?
  2. I have been approached by a VC who wants to potentially pre-empt a Series A. How do I best deal with this?
  3. We have lost two important pitches against a competitor in December. Can any of you spare some time to talk through our positioning statements and sales process?
  4. I am worried that key competitor X has just closed a $8m Series A round (see here for more info), how shall we best deal with this (if at all)?

Many thanks,
CEO








How to Use the List of Investors in Europe

We recently published a list of Investors in Europe. I have now been approached by dozens of founders who want guidance on how to best approach these investors.

The best way to think about figuring out which VCs to approach is counterintuitive. Most founders try to pick the right VCs off the list. Given their lack of knowledge about each firm, they typically end up picking all the wrong investors (e.g. they are looking to raise a seed round and are picking famous US firms that are looking for Series A and B deals in Europe).

The right way to use the list is not to pick the right VCs. The right way is to exclude the wrong ones. This is how you do it:

  1. Make a copy of the list
  2. Remove all investors who are not investing at your stage (e.g. you are raising a seed round and they only do Series A and Series B rounds)
  3. Remove all investors who are only investing in specific geographies you are not in (e.g. they invest in Scandinavian companies and you are a US founder living in Germany)
  4. Remove all investors who are only investing in specific industries you are not in (e.g. you are an e-commerce company and they only invest in cleantech)

That is it. You should end up with a list of ca. 50–100 investors or so. That is your target list. You didn’t pick any of these firms. You just removed the ones that are not relevant to you.

Next, you need to figure out whom you know who can introduce you to these VCs. Use LinkedIn. Use Conspire. Make sure you are connected to all of your current investors, mentors and advisors. Also, ask all of them which firm they can intro you to and then show them the target list and ask them whom they know.

Craft a forwardable email. Send the person who should intro you to the VC that email. They will reach out on your behalf and, if successful, will intro you to the partner.

And that is how you use the list effectively. Good luck with the fund raising.

PS: I wrote a manual on how to best raise VC funding almost ten years ago. This is as valid today as it was back then. It explains all the steps in much detail.








The 20 Percent Law: What Founders and Investors Don’t Know

Every time, when I see a pre-launch company that raises a seed round, hires a team and then works six months towards the product launch, it breaks my heart. Typically it doesn’t work out. Then they spend three months to try and fix it, and it still doesn’t work. Then they have three months of runway left and then they reach out to me and ask me to fix their company.

But I can’t. And the reason is the 20% law:

“Whenever you launch a new product, you have a 20% chance of it working out.”

20%

I learned this lesson the hard way at Forward Labs. We used to bring in founders and we would surround them with a team of experienced developers, marketers, designers, etc. Even when you have a team of proven people who are all very, very good at what they do and have done it for many years, your chances of success when you launch a new product is low.

20%

That is the percentage of products that worked when we launched.

20%

Founders, startups and their investors are ruled by the 20% law and they don’t know it.

So here is a solution that we tried and that worked out for us.

Launch, see whether it works, then change drastically very quickly when it doesn’t. And with drastically I mean no A/B testing. When you need a 10x change, no little tweaking will ever get you there.

So — be bold and make drastic changes.

Do the math. When you relaunch your product or pivot your product ten times, you have a combined 90% chance of it working out.

How many rockets did SpaceX blow up to achieve a successful landing? Yes, quite a few…

So would you invest 75% of your cash in the first rocket with a 20% chance of success? Probably not, but many founders still do it with their companies.

It is thus no surprise that most of them blow up. But it still breaks my heart.








€15BN and counting: A beautiful map, a list of 300+ investors and more

We have been busy at work here at the Techstars Accelerator in Berlin. Over the last few weeks, we took at a look at some of the resources we’ve made available to the founders in our Berlin class. And then we thought it was silly to we keep these resources to ourselves. So we have decided to start opening these resources to everyone, starting today.

The first thing we are releasing is a list of 300+ investors who routinely invest in Seed, Series A or Series B rounds in European startups (we have included countries bordering the Mediterranean, such as Turkey and Israel). This list currently totals some €15BN in funds that are available for investment in European startups right now. This list has the most up to date investor information as we contacted each firm to get the right facts and figures.

You can gain access to the full list with lots of information on each investor here.

We also made a little map illustrating roughly how these investors distribute across Europe. Hotspots are easily visible. You can find a high resolution version of map is in the Techstars Berlin Resources space.

 

Techstars Investors in Europe v1

The list is already proving popular with founders, despite us having shared it with a very small group of people only. Everybody can contribute to it via comments or by emailing us.

So far, €15BN and counting…lots more to come.

#givefirst

#networkoverhierarchy

Are you a founder? Want to talk to the Techstars Berlin team? Apply for office hours here. We try to talk to as many founders as we can.

You can pre-apply for Techstars Berlin here.

The list actually has a longer story behind it, you can read more about that here.