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I recently moderated a panel discussion at CES 2016 on how to get from Seed to Series A and it ended up being great in a lot of ways. Topics were broad with some contrarian views on metrics and approaches. A few days later, a Techstars CEO posted a very relevant question on our email list and a great discussion ensued. I chimed in with some of the take-aways from the panel and thought I’d share them here.

A quick note of thanks to my esteemed panelists who provided great input and kept me on my toes!  Anjula Acharia-Bath of Trinity Ventures, Nihal Mehta of ENIAC Ventures, Jenny Fielding of Techstars and Adam D’Augelli of True Ventures.

The question from the CEO was:

“In your experience, what ARR is required before approaching investors for a Series A? I’ve received a few suggestions, but most suggestions come from our existing investors (with bias).

The email responses included some of the market-standard metrics like $100K MRR and double digit monthly growth as common targets.

Our panel went in a different direction on what it takes to get from Seed to Series A.  Part of the framing for the panel and the room was:

“In Q4 the venture market started to shift (I hate to use the loaded term “correction”) and the volatility we’ve already seen in January suggests this trend will continue.”

While getting rounds done isn’t going to get any easier in 2016, there is a lot you can do before going out to raise to improve your chances. As a group, we could not agree there was set number, or even one set of criteria that made any Series A round a given…

  • One of the themes that came out of the panel was that Series A is still about the overall story. Metrics do play a part, but the investors have to share the vision and the long term potential about a huge return at this stage.
  • Related to the point above, make sure you know who you are talking to and and how they like to make investments. For example, if you are talking to Bessemer, a prolific Cloud/SaaS investor, make sure your metrics are tight and you know their portfolio. If you are approaching True Ventures, know that they like to lead/co-lead the 1st institutional round.
  • One of my panelists thought that investor feedback of, “ your metrics aren’t quite there for a Series A” truly means “we just aren’t that excited but don’t want to say no yet.” A lot of VCs like to hold onto optionality by not saying no, but not saying yes either. In my experience a “no decision” is often a no and rarely changes. For what it’s worth, I got a lot of this with Filtrbox in 2009 when I was raising the A. I was at $70-80k MRR and growing just around 10% per month and was told, “if you were over $100k MRR this would be an easy round to do.” I think I heard this over a dozen times.  We would have been at over 100k by the time the round closed. At the time this was super frustrating because investors were using it as a smokescreen and that option value. Had I been growing 20-30% M/M for 6 months, I think it would have been different. Note that 2009 was a very hard time to raise money, but the market is turning in that direction more than where we were in 1H 2015.
  • Growth and solid G2M metrics are a bit of a proxy for gross MRR, but you have to have enough runtime with those numbers for investors to be comfortable they are real and will stick around. Two to three months of high growth might get the meeting, but everyone is going to want to see another chapter or two unless they fall in love with the business on the spot or have FOMO.
  • The Series A crunch is real in that there are many seed-funded companies but not a commensurate growth in Series A funds out there — what this means is that rounds are going to be harder to get done and truly based on fit between the fund and the company. Do your VC research deeply and make sure they are a fit on paper so you don’t waste time.
  • I heard anything from $50k MRR to $250k MRR for Series A on the panel. Not super helpful given the range but illustrates the dynamic a bit.
  • Every investor will tell you to, “Have eighteen months of runway, be able to run at break-even, and it’s about survival if the market gets really bad,” – pretty vanilla and predictable advice, but the reason for it is investor risk-mitigation. If I fund a company’s A round and the sh*t hits the fan, I want to know we can batten down the hatches and ride it out without having to put in more money.
  • “Build relationships, not pitches,” was discussed as well. The panel debated whether this was true for seed rounds vs. Series A. The gist of the debate was that many Series A round investment decisions can happen when the investor is in “advice mode” and the light bulb goes off.

Check out a recording of the full panel below:

If this is helpful and/or you have more questions about raising your Series A – let me know in the comments.


Ari Newman
Partner at Techstars Ventures. Prior to his focus on early stage investing, Ari spent over a decade as an entrepreneur, founding several companies and joining other venture backed technology companies.