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Startup Weekend DU is an incredible opportunity for students of different disciplines to join forces and turn ideas into tangible businesses, apps, websites, through real world entrepreneurial experience. Two departments at DU have recognized the value that students get from participating in this 54-hour intensive event and have offered course credit for DU attendees.

Note: All add/drop slips will be collected on Sunday afternoon before final pitches occur. The organizers will make an announcement and will have extra forms for students who didn’t fill them out before the event. 

 

Business elective (2 credits): 

Starting a company requires a vision, energy, the ability and willingness to adapt based on feedback, and the ability to present your work in an appealing manor to prospective customers, clients, and investors. By going through Startup Weekend’s curriculum, you will accomplish much of the initial stages of starting a company, and paired with Startup Weekend’s resources, you’ll likely be able to get further than you could on your own. To receive credit, you need to bring a copy of your ticket to Startup Weekend and a course add/drop slip to Dr. Stephen Haag in the Daniels College of Business, who will help you fill out the course information, or you can do this during the event on Sunday afternoon. At the end of the weekend, you will write a 2-3 page reflection of what you set out to do, how you did or didn’t accomplish your initial goals, and what changed along the way. (If nothing changed along the way you did something wrong – how did you incorporate customer feedback? etc.) Submit this paper to Dr. Stephen Haag within 1 week of completing the event (Sunday, March 19th) so that the experience will be fresh in your head.

Continuation of the Business elective (additional 2 credits):

You’ve completed a Startup Weekend! You’re now part of a global network of hundreds of thousands of Startup Weekend alumni! The question every attendee asks their team after the event ends on Sunday night is “So… Now what?” Startup Weekend is a great platform to enable its attendees to develop ideas into the foundation of a company. The next step in the entrepreneur’s journey is continuing to expand on your work from the weekend and set some goals for your new company, take it further than you could in a weekend and run your tests, mockups, adaptations, and iterations on a larger timeline. The second part of this course is structured more as an independent study: at the end of the weekend, decide who on your team is interested in continuing to work on your company, and create a list of goals that you want to accomplish in 5 weeks (or longer!). Bring a 1-2 page outline of how you and your team wish to continue working on your company, what obstacles you encountered over the weekend and how you anticipate overcoming those or other foreseen problems down the road. Describe what you want your company to look like long term (you can use lean canvas to help), then based on your long-term vision, describe where you hope to be in 5 weeks and how you will get there. On May 15th the organizers will host another meetup on campus for the teams that continue, with a couple mentors and/or judges from the event, and we’ll have another round of pitches followed by questions from the audience. If you decide to continue with your idea, you may do 1 of 2 things for written submission: 1) Write a 2-3 page paper after the weekend (as mentioned above), then a second 3-4 page paper describing your continued experience building your company, or 2) Do not write a paper immediately after the weekend, but instead write a 7-8 page paper describing your entire entrepreneurial journey from Startup Weekend to the pitches 5 weeks later. This shall be submitted to Dr. Stephen Haag on Friday, May 22nd.

 

Computer Science elective (2 credits):

Starting a company requires a vision, energy, the ability and willingness to adapt based on feedback, and the ability to present your work in an appealing manor to prospective customers, clients, and investors. By going through Startup Weekend’s curriculum, you will accomplish much of the initial stages of starting a company, and paired with Startup Weekend’s resources, you’ll likely be able to get further than you could on your own. To receive credit, you need to bring a copy of your ticket to Startup Weekend and a course add/drop slip to Professor Ramki Thurimella, chair of the computer science department, who will help you fill out the course information, or you can do this during the event on Sunday afternoon. To receive credit, you must have created a software prototype of your idea during the weekend. This may be in a variety of forms – and doesn’t have to be perfectly functioning code, but in order to receive full credit, you must comment your code appropriately and have a functioning end product. If your team pivots (changes ideas partially or entirely), KEEP YOUR OLD CODE!! At the end of the weekend you will write a 1-2 page analysis of how you implemented your idea into code, your challenges and successes, and how you were able to implement changes to your product through feedback gathered over the weekend. All project files and the paper should be compressed into a .zip file and submitted to Professor Ramki Thurimella by Sunday, March 17th.

Continuation of Computer Science elective (additional 2 credits):

You’ve completed a Startup Weekend! You’re now part of a global network of hundreds of thousands of Startup Weekend alumni! The question every attendee asks their team after the event ends on Sunday night is “So… Now what?” Startup Weekend is a great platform to enable its attendees to develop ideas into the foundation of a company. The next step in the entrepreneur’s journey is continuing to expand on your work from the weekend and set some goals for your new company, take it further than you could in a weekend and run your tests, mockups, adaptations, and iterations on a larger timeline. The second part of this course is structured more as an independent study: at the end of the weekend, decide who on your team is interested in continuing to work on your company, and create a list of goals that you want to accomplish in 5 weeks (or longer!). Bring a 1-2 page outline of how you and your team wish to continue working on your company, what obstacles you encountered over the weekend and how you anticipate overcoming those or other foreseen problems down the road. Describe what you want your company to look like long term (you can use lean canvas to help), then based on your long-term vision, describe where you hope to be in 5 weeks and how you will get there. If you’re working with a business student, you may use the same plan, but add technical goals for yourself – how will your product manifest the business’s goals? On May 15th the organizers will host another meetup on campus for the teams that continue, with a couple mentors and/or judges from the event, and we’ll have another round of pitches followed by questions from the audience. This round of pitching will include a LIVE DEMO where you can show off your work! You will get a couple minutes during the pitch to talk about the technical aspect of your company, summarizing your challenges and successes during the life of your product. Write a 1 page summary of your developing process, your challenges and iterations, how you incorporated feedback from customers/clients, and how your goals influenced your work style. If you’re working with a business student you can add this to their final report. Please submit your functioning project and final summary to Professor Ramki Thurimella in a .zip file no later than Friday, May 22nd.

Jace Lieberman