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Not so long ago, mobile phones were the platform of the future. Back in 2004, Nokia was the reigning market leader in terms of sold units, the iPhone did not exist and media messaging and cameras on phones were exciting capabilities. It’s fascinating how much the market has changed in recent years and advanced systematically.

Of late, there’s been a lot of talk about virtual reality, and micro gaming industry (casino and betting) have fished opportunities by launching various prototypes like the VR Roulette. Since VR technology allows for the immersive experience it became a sensation quick. Various headsets are available for purchase, and consumers will “terraform” the market.

Much similar to the mobile industry, segmentation of immersive reality will take place determined by the wants and needs of different consumers. E.g. hardcore gamers will be likely to embrace the Oculus Rift, a VR headset, to provide the most stunning and powerful 3D experience. On the flipside, powerful hardware is needed to run the headset, moreover, it has to be tethered to a PC. This is not appealing.

For the casual game player, the Samsung Gear, is more suitable and is cable free but only exclusively compatible with the Samsung phone, therefore it is limiting. Without a doubt, it is a diabolical ploy to get people to upgrade their phones or purchase the company’s phones.

From the development and content perspective, understand which devices will appeal to certain gamers is very critical, making it is essential to develop content relevant and applicable, capable of harnessing the power of the device fully.

Many companies are still toddlers in immersive reality, but not for long since the market is quickly gaining momentum and customer engagement is becoming more familiar, making content targeting possible and easier.


Another exciting technology, with the power to cause some tremors up, is augmented reality or AR. Most will be bewildered to know that the AR concept has been around longer even over a century, in 1901 the author L. Frank Baum spoke of the idea of an electronic display/spectacles that superimposes images onto real life. Only recently has it made advancements.

Consumer products research teams have been utilizing AR for sales purposes, to display these products to prospective clients. For example, a cabinet sales representative can’t bring a 6ft, heavy cabinet to a client’s office boardroom for a sales meeting, instead AR is used to showcase the product in 3D, what better way to showcase the product? Also, soft-drink companies like Coca-Cola use AR when selling to retailers.

Augmented reality has the potential to enhance the world we live in massively. But like many technologies, it has to become ubiquitously available for everyone, before it can be appointed on platforms like online gaming. When this becomes evident happen, AR will have the potential to deliver a richer gaming experience but it’s an exciting prospect.

When you combine AR and VR together, remarkable creations come to life, the Microsoft HoloLens, a device cleverly combining augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) with the real world, a triple bonanza of some sort. The headset is of high quality and impressive resolution. Moreover, it’s fully wireless no wired connections to a PC is required.

However, challenges, such as loss of privacy, are emerging but this technology is exhilarating. Imagine a future where you person go about your daily activities, like taking the bus and going to the retail store, but not physically but through a set of unique glasses, all your entire experience heightened by adverts, games, communication, etc.

What’s become conspicuous in these few years is that we are no longer talking about the mobile platform as just the latest device. Wearables devices like the HUDs and HWDs are now extending their grasp on the mobile platform, and they possess the ability to greatly influence the communications industry.

Whether it is AR or VR, or something revolutionary to be discovered, new technologies are often dynamic and advancing. Therefore mass adoption is key, as we have observed with the mobile industry, and consumers will ultimately dictate the success of these potentials. With futuristic headsets on sale to the public, it’s just a matter of time before they go mainstream.



Aleksander Bordvik
(@ABordvik)