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Technology is growing and dynamically changing rapidly; particularly in the gaming industry, more things are possible today in contrast to during the 90s no matter how best we tried to make it happen. Flash forward today, some of the most creative inventions are emerging to the frontline of the technology industry through Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR). Even though my interest lies in B2B solutions, we really can’t ignore the gaming industry and what the future holds for gaming consumers.

Augmented and virtual reality both have one thing in common. They both have the unimaginable ability to alter our perception of the physical world. Where they differ, however, is the perception of our presence. What I mean by that is, when it comes to gaming, Virtual Reality overrules Augmented Reality. Even though the latter is more successful than the former in the commercial industry.

When I was a kid, one of my favorite game was Commandos: Behind Enemy Lines. Remember the game? Let us discuss a simple scenario based on that game in a AR/VR setting. You’re a soldier and you are required to make it across a military designated island base, further into enemy lines to retrieve some information. The developer can not only create the entire island to a specification but also add hindrances and obstacles along the way, for examples, exploding barrels, vehicles that are subject to bullet damage and explode, anything you can basically think of.

However, in augmented reality all that level of control is gone, poof! Take that game developed for instance, and immerse it in AR, as you play you constantly have to be mindful not to knock thongs down or hit actual walls of your rooms. This without a doubt is a bummer, one would have to design a real physical world, maybe outside for them to incorporate a game like this one, but then you will need huge amounts of space to play role playing games and military campaign games. That‘ll probably suck!

AR is good for plenty, but just not traditional games

That fact that control of the environment had been removed, puts augmented reality in a disadvantage. Sure you can talk to people on social media while taking a walk in the mornings or evenings down the street, that’s 100% okay, innovative and super but in gaming, AR just got a zero score. Games and stories pretty much require control and AR cannot afford it (yet). No one like revolving about the same spot 10-15 times in different games – unless you are a Pokemon fan who like to stay in one place all day long.

In games where you require a lot of creativity like strategy games then AR would cruise through without much value added, just not the traditional story based games. Another example of a great use of augmented reality: a visual task that doesn’t really need to progress or change as you use it.

Remember all the startup ideas you heard about skill sharing? Maybe it’s time to step up the game. One case could be people building PCs, AR provides the opportunity for tutors and tech-savvy individuals to share info about where which piece will go into a certain slot, or plumbing services how to fix the sink pipes. To add another example, you could teach someone how to play piano better by projecting onto the keys how to make that wonderful note like the famous Beethoven. In many fields, except gaming that is, this tech could quite literally transform everything.

Case-closing

To whoever will win this argument in the future, the answer could probably be based on one’s perception. But in the near future, VR will probably become the most dominant form of gaming, because simply the technology developing it is highly advanced than AR. However, as AR mechanics are improved, remember they are much younger than VR, in the coming years, we will likely see more successes. Indeed there could be room for both in the near future.

This blog post originally appeared on LinkedIn.

Jernej Dekleva
(@jernej)