Startup Reads: 11 Books Every Early-Stage Entrepreneur Should Read

I haven’t always been a big reader, but I’ve got more into it over the past few years of working with startups. In a past article, Five Pillars of Success: Curated Content for Early-Stage Entrepreneurs, I mentioned that last year I read 12 books. This year, instead of aiming for double (24), I set myself a stretch goal, and I’m aiming for 48. Will I make it? I’m going strong so far. 

With all this reading, I’ve come across some great books. I know lists are supposed to be top 10, but I loved all 11 of these too much to cut one off the list. 

Here my 11 top reads for early-stage entrepreneurs:

11. Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone To Take Action, by Simon Sinek

Why are you building this company? Why should people listen? Why are others successful, and you aren’t? This book may make you rethink why you’re building what your startup—but it will also surely help you tell your story better… or get you to work on something more aligned with your why. 

10. The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses, by Eric Ries

A book for aspiring entrepreneurs and early stage founders, Ries breaks it down into simple steps: how to systematically approach building your business, get it validated, make it profitable, and set up the basics for it to grow.

9. Do More Faster: Techstars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup, by David Cohen & Brad Feld

Written by our Techstars co-founders, this book is an easy read of  bite-sized advice from across the brilliant worldwide network itself. Perfect for those who are new to the startup world to and want to figure out how to set up your company, get customers, hire—and many other must-knows for any early stage entrepreneur. 

8. Delivering Happiness: The Path to Passion, Profits, and Purpose, by Tony Hsieh

If you’re building a company and want to learn about how to make a good customer-centric business, with the best company culture, this book will show you how. It’s about more than just business, though, it’s also about life.

7. Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, by Sheryl Sandberg

Every company should make this book mandatory reading. It opened my eyes to gender inequality. While putting some responsibility on men to support women more, it also details how women can take the lead themselves to take part, aim higher, and take more risks. 

6. Sprint: How To Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days, by Jake Knapp

Know what the biggest startup killer is? Lack of market: when you build something no one wants. This is the book that the Google team wrote and practiced, and it will show you how to test (and possibly invalidate) ideas in five days. My team at Evolve used it before we sold our company to Hubspot, so I can tell you that it really works.

5. Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets, by Al Ramadam, Dave Peterson, Christopher Lockhead, and Kevin Maney

This book explains how launching a startup is more than about creating and launching products. It discusses why you should consider launching a product category, and how and why to condition the market so they demand your solution. 

4. Hacking Growth: How Today’s Fastest-Growing Companies Drive Breakout Success, by Sean Ellis & Morgan Brown

In my opinion, the number one growth marketing book of all time. I’ve read it yearly since 2010, and recommended it to every founder I meet. Need customers? Is your current customer acquisition strategy not working? Not sure how to run marketing experiments? Read this!

3. Never Split the Difference: Negotiating as if Your Life Depended On It, by Chris Voss

Written by an ex-FBI hostage negotiator, this is the book that every one of my book club members said I have to include here. It’s the way to get better at negotiations and influence—and get what you want. Note: it’s not just useful for sales people, it’s helpful for all types of negotiations, or even discussions with partners, friends, or family.

2. Mastering the VC Game: A Venture Capital Insider Reveals How to Get from Start-up to IPO on Your Terms, by Jeffrey Bussgang

This is one you won’t find on other lists. It’s a perspective from the other side: an entrepreneur turned VC. So keep this a secret. Knowing how they think will help you plan your moves. It’s a little more technical and financial than the others here, but it’s worth the read when you’re a little later on and want that opposite perspective.

And my #1 recommendation is….

1. Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future, by Ashlee Vance

If you’re looking for inspiration about changing the world, look no further. In my eyes, Elon is by far the greatest innovator of our time. I mean, he brought together a brilliant team, and learnt how to build a rocket from scratch, for a lot less money too. I also really appreciate that Elon didn’t get “final revisions,” so the book has a certain raw, unbiased lens.

So now what? Go read the books. You don’t have to read one a week like me or even one a month, but if there’s one thing I learnt from all of these books, you have to set goals so you can stay motivated and keep it consistent.

Lastly, don’t forget to reread your books. In case you didn’t know, the most successful people in the world all say that you shouldn’t just read a book once and put it away. The best part is reading it again when older, smarter, at a different stage, or after you’ve gone through different experiences that the book touched on — unlocking more value from the book for you.

What are some of your favorite book recommendations? Tweet me @iamsabakarim








At the Intersection of Communication and Humanity

How to be a Considerate Communicator

By Ray Newal, Managing Director of Techstars Bangalore Accelerator

The Metaphor of the Traffic Light

On a recent bike ride, while passing through a four-way intersection, a thought occurred to me regarding the role of contracts and signaling systems in interdependent situations. Without traffic lights, speed limits, and a contract between drivers to obey the traffic laws, cars would crash into each other a lot more than they do. Bike riders like myself would never stand a chance. The combination of signaling systems and contracts allow us to bring order to chaos. In the case of traffic, these systems help us get from point A to point B in one piece.

But what happens when the signals and associated contracts are no longer relevant to our behaviors, or can’t keep pace with the magnitude of interdependencies? Technology has a way of impacting human behaviors and sometimes making them obsolete. When behaviors change, we need new ways to manage them. Prior to traffic signals, cars and carriages were sufficiently sparse and slow enough to allow the driver (or rider) to visually assess the situation at an intersection and act accordingly. As cars became cheaper and faster, and roads became more highly trafficked, the visual approach stopped working, leading to the advent of traffic signals and road signs.

While communications started out as a simple interdependency, it too has become increasingly complex.

The Telephone and the Mailbox

Here’s a previous, universally accepted communications contract: the sender would dial or write when they had something to say, and the recipient would pick up or respond when they recognized an incoming call or a letter in the mail. This contract and signalling system worked very well when communications required us to be physically proximate to the telephone or letterbox in order to receive calls or letters. It worked because the expectations of the caller or sender were defined by the chance that the receiver would be by their phone, or in the case of letters, that the mail would probably arrive—at some point. It was manageable and even fun for the recipient to get phone calls after dinner, or check the letterbox on the way home from work. On the off chance that the phone rang, or a letter was discovered in the letterbox, these communications received the full attention of the recipient—even a telemarketing call may have been received with pleasure!

Our Relentless, Wireless World

In a wireless world with devices always readily available in our pockets or purses, we find ourselves in dire need a of a better contract and signalling system. Even though our devices never leave our sides, the device in your pocket now works harder for the sender, making sure those competing calls and messages get heard as soon as they arrive. Instead of making life easier, mobile and internet communication has conspired to create a feeling of obligation on the recipient side. The result? We feel like we have to be perpetually responsive to communications, regardless of whether we are focused at work, exercising at the gym, or spending quality time with loved ones.

Wireless technology, communications software, and mobile telephony have gradually increased the volume and frequency of communications, making us ubiquitously accessible, and creating a perceived obligation of round-the-clock responsiveness because we have yet to develop any new contracts or systems to deal with this increasingly complex interdependency. Just as there are potentially fatal consequences of traffic flowing without mutual acceptance of traffic signals and rules, there are also significant consequences of communications traffic flowing without a system that respects our ability to receive those communications with mental availability, and attention.

With the traffic light stuck on green, the flow of communications never stops, and our lack of attention has become the unfortunate by-product. In work and life, events that receive our full and undivided attention are rare and infrequent. Indeed we’ve stopped being present for much outside of what happens on the device in our pocket.

A New Contract for Communication

In the absence of any better signalling system for our digital communication, we need to develop a new contract for communication that is less reliant on the recipient to manage their accessibility. Considerate communication requires us to be conscious and empathetic of the recipient’s attention by selecting how and when we communicate with them. By considering the recipient, we also optimize the receptive value of what is being communicated, meaning we get the responses we need when we need them.

Here are some of my ideas on things we can do to be Considerate Communicators. I’d love to hear your ideas in the comments!

  1. Skip the cc

Let’s all agree to avoid copying each other on emails. I get it, copying is to ensure everyone relevant to a given subject is in the loop. Slack is a better tool for this: it’s a great repository for FYI’s, group discussions, and media pertinent to a topic. Instead of using email to keep everyone in the loop, let’s use email to send things to people who need to receive and respond to that specific subject.

  1. Set email priorities

In email, there are things I need to respond to ASAP, and there are things I need to look at within the next day or two. For anything else, we shouldn’t be using email. Let’s use the tools that come in just about every email system these days to mark priorities, so that no one misses a message that needs to be seen and responded to within the next day. Everything else will get a response within 48 hours. If it doesn’t require a response it won’t be sent as an email, it will go to Slack.

  1. Urgent contact

When something needs to be seen and acted on NOW, there are tons of tools that do a good job of grabbing someone’s attention. At Techstars, we use Voxer for truly urgent communications. You could also use messengers like Whatsapp, Facebook, Telegram, Slack DM, etc.—whatever works for your company, as long as you set expectations around that particular platform. Let’s use these sparingly, because very rarely does anything actually need to be responded to right away. Let’s not use calls unless it’s an absolute emergency. Unscheduled calls should fall within the domain of one’s friends and family members.

  1. Complex conversations

Let’s move complex multi-angled discussions to the place that complexity is best managed: scheduled synchronous communication. This can be Skype, Hangouts, phone calls, or a good old coffee meeting. Whether these are one-on-one or involve a group, these discussions are always best handled in real-time. But even if it only requires a one-on-one conversation, let’s remember to respect each other’s time by scheduling the conversation. An IM chat can also become an easy entry point into a synchronous voice or video discussion, if both parties agree to it.

  1. Respect the time block

Let’s honor and respect each other’s time blocks. Short of having a tool to manage our mutual awareness of each other’s time blocks, let’s just agree to not send work communication outside of the workday that requires an immediate response, unless it’s an urgent/crisis situation. Every workplace has its own definition of what this means, so feel free to interpret the word ‘urgent’ in a way that suits your environment. If you’re working across time zones, respect the clever default DND in slack, or build this into your expected response times for email and other modes of communication.

  1. Informing everyone

Let’s use Slack (non-DM and general channels) as a way to inform everyone. This means we have to stop using these channels as if they were continuous Whatsapp conversations, and instead add context to discussions so that those coming in later (that day, week, or year) can make sense of what is being shared.

A World With More Intentional, Better Communications

If we start becoming more intentional about being considerate communicators within our teams and with our friends and family, we will start to see some of the principles spread externally. It won’t happen immediately, but eventually our inboxes will be lighter, our Slack channels will be richer with context and information, coming back from vacation won’t be so daunting, and quite possibly, we’ll look forward to answering our phones again.

***

How do you keep your inbox lean and your startup team in sync? Share your favorite tips and tricks in the comments!








How To Shutter Your Startup: Best Practices for Corporate Dissolution

By Shannon Liston, Techstars Corporate Council

Just to be clear: This sheet is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship. Companies should consult their own attorneys for legal advice on these issues. Because of the generality of the issues discussed in this piece, the information provided may not apply in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

Sometimes, startups fail.

It’s painful and brutal—and nothing to be ashamed of. It’s part of many, many entrepreneurial journeys. But along with the emotional ups and downs, you’ve got to deal with the practical legal side of shutting down your startup.

The legal name for one version of this is corporate dissolution. If you don’t need the protections of bankruptcy (you’ve got low risk of litigation or disputes over claims), corporate dissolution may be right for your startup.

The Techstars legal team has created this best practices sheet to give you guidance and practical tips if your company is facing dissolution. Unsurprisingly, these will be different depending on which state you’re incorporated in—this sheet focuses on Delaware, because of the large number of US corporations incorporated there.

Long-Form v. Short-Form Dissolution

Long-form dissolution

Many smaller companies liquidate without the protections of federal bankruptcy law, as corporate bankruptcy can be very expensive. Instead, you can get some of the same protections through Delaware’s long-form dissolution process—it gives boards of directors similar protections, and provides company creditors with notice, plus an opportunity to present their claims.

Work with your legal counsel to make sure you meet all the formalities of the long-form process, like 60-days notice to all known claimants, including public notice, and a court approval process ( 8 Del. C. 1953, § 280).

Short-form dissolution

The formalities of the long-form process may be overkill for your company, especially if you’ve already sold your operating assets, if you stopped operations a while ago, or if you’re unlikely to have unknown creditors.

In this case, short-form dissolution may be right for you: it’s simpler and less expensive for many companies, and comes with fewer formalities than the long-form process (8 Del. C. 1953, § 275).

7 Steps to Dissolve a Business

  1. Obtain Board and Shareholder Approvals. Your company’s Board of Directors must approve the decision to dissolve and adopt a Plan of Liquidation.  A majority of the company’s shareholders must also approve the decision and the Plan of Liquidation.
  2. Pay Franchise Taxes and File an Annual Report. You must pay Delaware franchise taxes in full (including the current calendar year franchise tax) and file all applicable Annual Franchise Tax Reports. The Delaware Division of Corporations will not accept the Certificate of Dissolution (see below) until this step is done.
  3. Notify the IRS. Within 30 days of the Board approving the dissolution (the dissolution resolution date), your company must file a notice of dissolution with the Internal Revenue Service: Form 966.  
    1. If the dissolution involves the sale or exchange of corporate assets, Forms 8594 and 4797 might also be necessary.
    2. See the IRS checklist for other required filings.
  4. File for Dissolution with the State. Once the decision to dissolve is properly approved, the company must file a Certificate of Dissolution with the Delaware Division of Corporations.  
    1. If your company has stopped doing business and doesn’t have any remaining assets, it might qualify to file the short form certificate of dissolution.
    2. If the company is registered to do business in another state, it will have to withdraw or surrender those qualifications.
  5. Provide Appropriate Notice to Creditors and Stakeholders. Follow state law requirements to give notice of the dissolution to anyone with a claim against the company.  Delaware’s long-form dissolution notice requirements are here: 8 Del. C. 1953, § 280.
  6. “Winding Up”. After the dissolution is effective, the dissolved company is deemed to continue, generally for three years, for the limited purposes of winding up per the Plan of Liquidation. This means:
    1. Settling and closing the business;
    2. Liquidating remaining corporate assets;
    3. Settling claims;
    4. Resolving any lawsuits;
    5. Making final distributions to creditors, and if funds remain, to applicable shareholders.
  7. File Final Federal and State Tax Returns. Review the IRS checklist for closing a business and filing final returns. For the company’s final returns, check the box to indicate the tax return is a final return.

Do’s and Don’ts

Do: Act in accordance with your fiduciary duties.

It’s your responsibility to focus on maximizing the company’s value. For more on your obligations as a Director, see here.

Don’t: Disappear; act in a manner that presents a conflicting interest; arbitrarily pay back one creditor over another; etc.

Do: Send the filed Certificate of Dissolution to investors, describing your decision to dissolve and your efforts to maximize return to shareholders.  

Don’t: Use dissolution as an escape hatch.  

Dissolution alone does not abate actions, suits, or proceedings begun by or against your corporation prior to dissolution—or, generally speaking, for a period of three years after dissolution.

Do: Educate yourself on the several ways to wind down a company.  

Talk with your lawyer about which way to wind down your company is the best choice for your situation—the complexity of your company (number of employees, investors, creditors, etc.) will have a big impact on this.








People Ops Question: What is the single biggest People Ops mistake you see startups make?

By Sabrina Kelly, Techstars Vice President of People Operations

At Techstars, we define our mission in People Ops as the following: “We are strategic partners in building Techstars business by maximizing the value of our most important asset—our people. We attract, retain, develop, and support Techstars employees globally and aim to uphold our culture and values, in a manner that is inclusive to all.”

As VP of People Ops, I hear a lot of questions from founders. This series aims to answer the most frequent questions.

Q: What is the single biggest People Ops mistake you see startups make?

Hiring the wrong leaders and not course correcting soon enough.

Hiring leadership is hard at any stage, but there is a crazy amount of pressure on startup founders to hire them quickly. It’s really easy for founders to lose sight of the values that are important to them in these hires, due to pressure from the Board or other advisors on “who” and “what” is right for their business. This whiplash is amplified by the fact that they likely have a bunch of employees that need experienced leadership, and they are band-aiding that at the moment themselves.

Mainly, don’t ever make that hire unless you are 110% pumped to sit in the trenches with them.

My advice, as impossible as it might sound, is to take the time to get it right: be extremely thoughtful about the profile you are looking for, get alignment with your leadership team on how to interview, proactively source from diverse pipelines or hire a recommended agency to support. Mainly, don’t ever make that hire unless you are 110% pumped to sit in the trenches with them.

So, what if you do all of that and in six months you start to sense that it’s not working? As painful as it might be, you need to dedicate the time to figure out what the problem is—and if you find out it’s them, you let that person go as soon as humanly possible. It might feel like the company will crumble if you have to start over, but that pain is nothing in comparison to what can happen if you put up with the wrong leader for too long.

***

Want to #DoMoreFaster? Apply to a Techstars mentorship-driven accelerator today.








20 Ways to Blow Up Your Company

Techstars Mentor Jason Mendelson recently gave a talk to the Boulder program called, “20 Ways to Blow Up Your Company.”

Here are a few highlights. Be sure to check out all the details in the video below!

  1. Pick a Bad Idea
  2. Pick Bad Employees
  3. Being Arrogant
  4. Focusing Only on What You Don’t Know
  5. Being Overly Emotional and Not Analytic
  6. Know Your Business Model

 








Ask David Cohen: Developing an MVP and Reaching Investors

We recently held an AMA with Techstars’ Co-CEO, David Cohen, where he answered commonly asked questions from founders about topics such as forming a team, developing an MVP, and applying to an accelerator program.

This post is the first in a series of five which includes a transcript of David’s answers to these questions in this AMA. To sign up for our next AMA, check out the schedule here!


Any advice to founders who need more resources to develop an MVP or a presentable prototype? What’s the best method of getting investors to hear out the idea/plan when you don’t know anyone in the community?

These are kind of different questions so I am going to go at them separately. I’ll tell you a quick story of a company called Everlater that sold to MapQuest, AOL and came through Techstars. When I first met Nate and Natty, they were Wall Street types and loved to travel. We funded them, but we only funded them after watching them try to learn how to program.

They were so passionate about this idea coming out of their minds into the world that they actually taught themselves how to code – they were terrible at it, not very good at all. But later on, they got better, but it was still a crappy prototype and a crappy MVP. So step one is, having something is better than nothing.

If you can’t find somebody to do it, my question is, why can’t you do it? Do you think that writing a little software code is something that you have no ability to learn? It tells me something about you, that you are not willing to try. You could find a friend who does know how to program to spend a couple hours with you and show you how to get going.

You could say look, this is what I am talking about, it doesn’t work yet, but it’s what I’m talking about.

I believe great entrepreneurs do stuff.

If you can’t do that and you are allergic to keyboards and computers and you’re just never going to code, that’s cool too. Some of these languages, by the way, are very easy to learn now, it’s not like learning a foreign language, you can get a lot of help from the editor, and there are various simple languages out there that you can learn how to prototype things quickly.

There are lots of coding classes available online, so my first question is, why aren’t you doing that? If you can’t get somebody in the world who has those skills excited enough about what you are doing, or you can’t make friends with somebody who can help you with that, that is also a red flag for me as an investor.

The answer to the question is like anything else, just do it. That’s why it is Nike’s slogan, it’s so great and really the easy answer to a lot of things. Plus, I’m an early stage investor, I don’t care if the prototype is presentable, it doesn’t have to blow me away. You just have to start the meeting and say look, I hacked this together myself, we need funding to hire engineers and obviously the user experience is terrible. You know it is terrible, but that’s okay. You’re self-aware, it doesn’t have to be beautiful and great.

I think doing attracts investors. Talking about doing makes me think maybe you’re not an entrepreneur.

For the second part of the question, I would take a quality over quantity approach. I would find someone who does know the investors that you are targeting and I would figure out how to spend time with them. For example, I would go to someone that they funded or someone that they have worked with and mentored before and say, will you help me with this? They are likely more available than the investor and I would use them as a way to create an introduction to the investor.

I would also suggest you read my blog post on DavidGCohen.com called Small Asks First. It’s about the idea of not over-asking, which is really important in entrepreneurship. You are trying to get to a resource, it is very busy, so get an introduction from somebody they know – it’s not that hard, and just ask them for something small.

Let me give you an example of something big – lunch. Lunch is very big – you’re asking them to go spend time with somebody they don’t know for an hour, which is an awkward situation, especially if they’re an introvert like I am. That’s a big ask. I know it feels small to you but it’s a really big ask to me. Coffee – huge ask. I have another blog post called Coffee or Lunch? that I wrote on this topic. They would have to go out of the office, meet you somewhere, and the biggest thing is, I don’t know you… it’s a big ask for a first ask.

Here’s a small ask – send me a paragraph or two of why I can be helpful to you, and the one really simple thing I can do to be helpful to you. I have another blog post that is called The Perfect Email. Somebody wrote me out of the blue, not even introduced, with enough context that I thought it was the best email I ever read and so I reacted to it. I ended up having an exchange of dialogue with that person; I even blogged about it. I don’t know what happened there, probably nothing huge, but hopefully I was helpful in some way.

I think the context of why you’re reaching out to me and asking for something that is easy for me to do is great, because going to have lunch is actually not easy to do – I’m busy, I’m introverted, etc. What is easy is asking me to click on a link and tell you what I think of the messaging on your website, the primary tag line or whatever. If I don’t respond to that, I’m just an ass. That takes ten seconds for me to do. It’s a small ask, it creates engagement, I can just click on the link, see what you’re doing, have to think about it for a second and then respond. Now, you’re actually starting a dialogue by making a small ask of something that is very easy for that investor to do. That is a great way to build a relationship and you go from there. You can do that at scale to figure out who is interested and engage more with those people.

Eventually, you’ll end up having lunch and a meeting.

Interested in meeting other entrepreneurs and getting a head start on your own entrepreneurial journey? Check out a Startup Weekend near you or apply to an accelerator program.

At Techstars, we fully believe in the idea that no one is “too far along” for Techstars. Inversely, nothing is too early. Techstars has a program for every step of the entrepreneurial journey – from startup programs like Startup DigestStartup WeekStartup Weekend and Startup Next to later stage offerings, including the accelerator program and venture capital for add-on funding.








Making the Leap: From Corporate Employee to Entrepreneur

Today’s post comes from Nishika de Rosairo, CEO, Creative Director, and founder of dE ROSAIRO. Before becoming an entrepreneur, Nishika built a corporate career with Deloitte, Cisco, and Salesforce. In addition to leading her business, Nishika serves on several boards including Startup Women, Upward, and the Center for International Business Education and Research.

“Aren’t you scared?”
“What will you do if you fail?”
“You have no experience in the industry, how will you succeed?”
“Don’t worry, you can always go back to Corporate America”

… and so the questions and comments flooded in…

What surprised me the most was that these questions and comments were being dished out from a combination of people who knew me very well, and also from those who didn’t know me at all.

I soon started to realize that non-entrepreneurs were projecting their own anxieties of starting a business onto me.

So the real question became:

How do you listen to the parts that matter, and turn off the parts that don’t?

An Entrepreneur is Born

For me, entrepreneurship has always felt very real. I was still a teenager when I came to the realization that life would be boring if everyone succumbed to practices and principles denoting linear patterns of thinking and execution, simply because they made life easy to explain and easy to understand.

My version of happiness started to emerge around the same time when I turned to mentors such as Sir Richard Branson and Anthony Robbins. They taught me that happiness was a state of mind, achieved through a non-linear journey of strategy, discovery, and perspective: the perfect mindset for an entrepreneur.

I grew up with an adventurous spirit, and by the time I reached my 30s, I was living on my fourth continent, had traveled to over 40 countries, and my career in the corporate world was ripe and flourishing. Over my 10 years in Corporate America, I had the incredible opportunity of learning a repertoire of deep knowledge and expertise from the best of the best: Deloitte Consulting, Salesforce, Apple, Levi, Cisco, Chevron, and many others.

 

Even still, I wanted more.

I decided it was time to turn in the stability of a steady paycheck for something that was much more adventurous and impactful.

I wanted to change the world, one design at a time.

 

Building a Business

Finally, my business – dE ROSAIRO (pronounced ‘day ro-zai-ro’) — was born: it was a childhood dream coupled with a deep desire to influence the world through the inherent psychology behind the clothes we wear.

I spent 10 months writing my business plan and building the business on nights and weekends, all while still employed full time at Salesforce. At the end of that time, I had my first collection of sketches sitting on hangers in a sales showroom in Los Angeles. I built dE ROSAIRO on the founding principle of ‘Look Feel Lead’, which translates into — how you Look, is how you Feel, is how you Lead. The idea being that how we dress influences how we feel, and on the flipside, how we feel influences how we dress.

No matter how many people have shared their years of wisdom with me, not one person, or any one experience, could have truly prepared me for the broad depth and range of mental and physical strength it takes to be an entrepreneur.

Doubt is Part of the Journey

There are days I have wanted to pull my hair out, and then there are days that I know I am doing exactly what I should be. I would be lying if I didn’t admit the rough days.  

But the truth is: doubt is a part of the journey, as it continues to provide me with an opportunity to question even my most basic set of assumptions. Healthy businesses cannot be built on complacency and self-assurance.

Mistakes will be made, money will be lost, and through it all, the question that we will need to keep answering is – am I still aligned with my vision?

Why does alignment matter? It matters for two key reasons:

  1. When we launch a business, we should aim to build a foundation that aligns with our personal set of values. We need to ask ourselves: what matters to me? How do I want to affect the lives of others? What do I want my legacy to be?
  2. Doing ‘good business’ is no longer the icing on the cake; in today’s world it is a basic expectation. This means we each have a role to play.

Through this journey, what I’ve come to discover is: there is no greater measure of self-fulfillment than when profit, individual values, and ‘good business’ intersect.

So when you’re on the brink of YOUR entrepreneurial journey, and when people ask you:

“Aren’t you scared?”
“What will you do if you fail?”
“You have no experience in the industry, how will you succeed?”

Tell them that you would rather give it your best shot than regret not trying.

Tell them that you desire transformative growth in your life that a steady paycheck cannot provide.

Tell them that changing the world is worth the calculated gamble.








Startup Weekend Winners: A Q&A with Orate Co-Founder Sara Capra

Sara Capra is the co-founder of Orate – a DC-based startup that makes it simple for event organizers to find speakers within their budgets.

Orate’s story began last year at Startup Weekend DC – an event where participants launch startups in less than 54 hours. Orate took first place in that weekend’s competition – even though Capra had taken a chance to be there in the first place.

Capra entered Startup Weekend with some concerns that her idea wouldn’t resonate with event participants. She was quickly proved wrong — she and Orate co-founder Veronica Eklund ended up building the largest team, which developed a mock-up of the future platform.

Sara shared Orate’s journey with Startup Weekend DC’s Elvina Kamalova. Answers have been edited for length and clarity:

Tell us about Orate.

Orate is an online platform that simplifies the process of finding, vetting, and booking public speakers simple. Our mission is twofold: 1) Make it easy to find quality speakers on any budget; and 2) Assist speakers in more effectively marketing themselves and getting them in front of the right audiences.

What was the role of Startup Weekend in starting and developing your project?

The Orate journey began at Startup Weekend DC in 2014. It was the launch pad for what Orate has become, and sparked the initial evolution of the concept. We began with an idea to alleviate the stress of filling last minute speaking cancellations. That resonated with many people, but through the feedback process over the weekend, we decided the business model around that was not one that would be sustainable.

Through our mentors, sending out surveys, and in-depth conversations with the team, we decided the business model needed to be based on more than that. Startup Weekend helped to give us the ecosystem and structure we needed to take our first big step in understanding how to test and validate our ideas.

How did you build your team?

Building the team during startup weekend was mostly organic. Initially, I was concerned there wouldn’t be enough interest. One of the great things about Startup Weekend is that you only need two people to work on an idea. My co-founder attended and joined my team, so we would be able to explore the idea no matter what. It turns out there was quite a bit of interest, and we ended up with the largest team in the competition. I thought our most important team member would be a developer, ideally one who knew front and back end since this was meant to be a web and mobile app.

One of the most important lessons I learned that weekend was how much you can do with a little bit of resourcefulness and creativity, when there’s a lack of technical expertise. We had a wonderful graphic designer.

As opposed to trying to build out any applications over the weekend, she instead mocked up what we wanted the website to look like. That way, we could walk the audience through the customer journey, without getting too bogged down with feature aspirations and technical details. After all, it was just the beginning! We knew if so much could change in one weekend, there were many more changes to come.

What are the biggest challenges in your startup journey?

The biggest challenges have shifted over time. Initially it was staying focused. There were so many things to be excited about – potential partnerships, big ideas, ideas within those ideas, the way you envision the company 1, 2, 3 years down the road.

The challenge is taking that long-term vision and working backward to map out your trajectory starting with today, and breaking down steps for initial short-term growth. We’re over a year in and have now seen a lot of our early ideas come to fruition. We are still constantly brainstorming, but we’re much more skilled at capturing ideas for a future state, and continuing to stay focused on the short-term execution to make them happen.

The other challenge we face is getting into the heads of our customers. Collectively, we’ve conducted hundreds of formal and informal interviews, feedback surveys, and tests. While there are times that what users say and what they do are parallel, we have found that monitoring their actions is most effective.

Did you have technical skills coming to SW?

Aside from some basic HTML (we all had MySpace, right?), I didn’t have any experience with coding going into Startup Weekend DC. However, attending the event and launching the company inspired me to spend more time learning about software development, and gave me the ability to discuss the basics of other languages when I need to.

Tell us how you realized your goal for building your venture.

I’m still getting there! We are in the middle of fundraising to get to our next phase. We have achieved a lot so far. We’ve scaled our speaker database extensively, had only positive feedback from clients, and launched a new website and subscription service. While I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished, we don’t rest on our laurels. We have big plans moving forward and the wonderful team me and my co-founder have built is at the core of making those happen.

How did you raise your first funding?

We socialized Orate early and often. We pitched a lot, organized the data and financial information we had to help us have informed conversations, and put all of our cards and chips on the table. Our initial round was mostly from angel investors, and some funding came from the accelerator program Orate participated in called The Startup Factory.

What would be your advice to starting entrepreneurs?

Sharpen your communication skills. Entrepreneurs must always be networking and selling, even if their title or job responsibilities don’t formally include it. Entrepreneurs have to effectively communicate with and motivate their team to execute on the vision. They need to be good role models, and inspire the team to be brand advocates. Establishing and growing relationships are crucial to starting a company. Being a genuine, impactful, and effective communicator, is instrumental in that process.

It’s also important to get comfortable being uncomfortable. Take the “no’s,” the risk, the ambiguity, self-doubt, and constant change, and learn from it all. After you learn from it, embrace it. Two of the best things about life are that almost nothing is final and the possibilities are endless. Reflect on the lessons you learned, what led you there, and use them to make better, more informed decisions moving forward. This is one of the reasons it’s crucial to have good advisors and mentors. You need a brain trust that can help you step back, put things in perspective, and work through challenges.

To start your own startup story, join us for Startup Weekend on September 25-27. Register here and buy your tickets today!








Secrets to getting accepted into 500 Startups

With an acceptance rate of a dismal 1 percent, getting into 500 Startups’ accelerator program is definitely not easy. To put that number into perspective, Stanford’s fall 2012 acceptance rate is a more encouraging 6.6 percent.

Now, to work on a bitcoin startup and get accepted into the prestigious accelerator program, that is even more challenging.

So how did CoinPip, a bitcoin wallet service and payment solution for merchants in Asia started in January 2014, get accepted into 500 Startups Batch 11?

coinpip-share
CoinPip allows merchants and users to send money to anywhere in the world through blockchain technology.

Back in 2010, the seeds of CoinPip were already planted when Ben Bernanke announced Quantitative Easing (QE) infinity. Anson Zeall, now founder of CoinPip, was then a successful hedge fund manager returning 35% P.A. for investors. He thought it was time for something else when he heard the news. A friend of his then introduced him to bitcoin and he jumped in.

Anson Zeall, co-founder of CoinPip
Anson Zeall, co-founder of CoinPip

Within a short span of 1 year, the company has expanded operations quickly into neighbouring countries – Indonesia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Philippines and even the USA. However, not all was easy and smooth sailing. In mid 2014, the company was running out of money. Around this time, a group of startups in Singapore, together with CoinPip, started the Association of Cryptocurrency Enterprises and Startups Singapore (ACCESS). This caught the attention of Sean Percival – venture partner at 500 Startups and the road to securing their seed funding began.

The first secret is – Do something big and bold to show your belief

This coming Friday, 17th July, Anson Zeall will be sharing with participants of Startup Weekend Asia-America in person, his personal story of overcoming all obstacles to finally building a company in the Bitcoin space that spans across countries in Asia and America.

See you there!

Startup Weekend Asia-America
San Francisco
July 17th-19th, 2015








How To Conquer the Emotional Rollercoaster of Startup Weekend

After 9 Startup Weekends in three years, I’ve come to the conclusion that it is one of the most exhilarating experiences of my life (in fact, I’ve written previously that I might be addicted to it). However, for some that the journey could be really intense at times, and not everyone makes it to the finish line feeling the same way.

Recently, I facilitated Startup Weekend Miami: Diversity Edition, where I was taught the concept of “la pasión,” which is Spanish for “people in Miami are really, REALLY emotional.” I was tasked to harness la pasión in a community that had a plethora of it, in a way that would make everyone come away from Startup Weekend Miami feeling as wonderful as I had 8 times before.

Below is a list of lessons and tips for a facilitator, organizer, or volunteer to apply that would help maintain a sense of stability to an otherwise potentially chaotic event.

1. If you’re an organizer or volunteer, your mission is to execute the event as orderly as possible

In Startup Weekend, Murphy’s Law generally applies – anything that can go wrong will go wrong. It is vital that every organizer and volunteer is informed of the weekend’s tasks and can easily communicate with one another to correct any situation that arises.

Otherwise… this will happen…

Best practice: Print up a universal task list that specifies each delegation and giving a copy to all your volunteers. That way, even if they don’t have an assignment, they can look at the list to see if someone else needs help with something.

2. If you’re the facilitator, your first priority is to take care of the lead organizer

I got your back, Paula.

Generally, lead organizers shoulder the most burden, and the stress can be overwhelming. They should be acknowledged especially for their months of hard work leading up to the big show.

E Pluribus Unum, people.

Facilitators should check in with them hourly and make sure they’re fed, hydrated, and as relaxed as you can get them. If necessary, give them a hug (more on that later).

That'll do, senorita. That'll do.
That’ll do, senorita. That’ll do.

3. Communicate to people on their level – perhaps even in their language

Startup Weekend is an educational event at its core, and the most effective way to teach is to contextualize it with abstract reasoning that they understand. Learn more about them to understand their thinking processes.

Just being honest here.
Just being honest here.

An added challenge for me: most of the attendees of Startup Weekend Miami speak Spanish as their first language. I do not – except for what I’ve learned on TV –  so when people weren’t looking, I’d review my Dora The Explorer Lessons on YouTube and bust that out randomly. You’re welcome, mi amigo/as.

4. If teams are arguing without end, facilitate a scrum

Inevitably, disagreements occur in a competition, but they become difficult to resolve when people are not talking in a respectful, orderly fashion.

This was not that far off from the truth.
This almost happened at the event. More on that later.

To resolve this, get them to stand up and talk in a circle, one at a time. Here’s a quick video to teach you how to run a proper scrum – a very popular method of coordinating large, diverse teams.

(The key lesson starts at 6:32)

I did this with one team in particular. More on that later.

5. Have a quiet space – one for volunteers, one for participants

"Let me answer that question once I'm done with this Tweet."
“Let me answer that question once I’m done with this Tweet.”

We all need to decompress, so give your people a place to rest, nap, socialize, and blow off some steam. Don’t go so far as create a distracting place such as a game session – you still want people to focus on on the main goal.

6. Throw in a dance session or two (you’ll have to start it)

I'm going to regret this once people stop listening to "Uptown Funk" by Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars.
I’m going to regret this once people stop listening to “Uptown Funk” by Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars.

It was a foregone conclusion that I’d be dancing in Miami. It was just a matter of how often. I like to keep the music playing in a common area for attendees to come out, relax, and practice their salsa.

It is possible to have more rhythm than a native Argentinian, apparently.
It is possible to have more rhythm than a native Argentinian, apparently.

Dancing is a great way to stay loose and relaxed, and it’s probably less terrifying than, say, public speaking.

7. Prevent “hanger” by providing snacks and insist that everyone drink water frequently

Startup Weekend is a high-energy competition, and with brains working on overdrive, they’ll need to be replenished. I try to have a bottle of water and a protein-rich snack on my person at all times. Keep your people well-fed, and they’ll be well-tempered, too.

8. Give out hugs and high-fives whenever possible

Paula could not stop hugging me. I do not blame her.
Paula could not stop hugging me. I do not blame her.

I’m a big fan of Simon Sinek‘s recent work Leaders Eat Last, where he describes the importance of establishing physical contact to build relationships and trust among people.

At a hyper-networking event like Startup Weekend, these physical embraces lead to lasting connections that you’ll appreciate long after this experience.

9. Plan to finish your event as soon as possible…

This crowd will turn on you otherwise.
This crowd will turn on you otherwise.

Things might get delayed, so try to move as quickly. Here are a few tips I’ve learned while facilitating for NYC and Orlando:

  • Links only: Instead of letting people present and demo on their own laptops with varying file types, have them send cloud-based links to both and put them in a single document. This moves things along quickly in between Q&A sessions.
  • 4:3 presentation model: Limit presentations to 4 minutes with a loose 3 minutes for judges’ Q&A works well, too. Judges average about 45 seconds per question, so a group of 3-5 judges works well.

Why do we do this?

10. … so that everyone will go to the after-party

Yay! We did it! exha *0981231
Yay! We did it! (exhales…)

I love the idea of an after-party, but often Startup Weekends run too late, and who can really stick around to party on a Sunday night? However, if you aim to end your event around 8pm or earlier, and your event was a rousing success, you’ll have a great time.

Also, try to have ALL of your parties in Miami, regardless of your own location. Here’s why:

We got a pool!
We got a pool!
bouncy-castle
A bouncy castle for adults!
A photo booth!
A photo booth!

However, despite all of these tips, I should say that there needs to be some room for la pasión in a Startup Weekend. For example:

When a team that nearly imploded on Saturday night…

Team BreakinBread was a fun project for me. Constantly bickering in Spanish over every single detail, I was positive that they would implode and disband by Saturday night.

Serial entrepreneur and LiveAnswer CEO Adam Boalt guides a team of future entrepreneurs.
Serial entrepreneur and LiveAnswer CEO Adam Boalt guides a team of future entrepreneurs.

To fix this, I made them do a scrum. By getting them to talk in turn and truly listen to one another, they realized that they were actually a well-rounded team that agreed on one thing: they had communication problems.

What a difference a day makes!
What a difference a day makes!

Afterwards, they delivered a beautiful presentation that impressed the judges. The rest is Startup Weekend Miami history: they won first place.

Or when a team that won 2nd place got a standing ovation…

Team HandyCab
Team HandyCab

Meet Ernie.

Ernie struggles to get where he needs to be due to the lack of convenient transportation options for the disabled. His dedicated friend Juan pitched an idea:

Not too shabby! By Adam Leonard of Happy Fun Corp.
Not too shabby! Artwork by Adam Leonard of Happy Fun Corp.

An “Uber for the differently-abled,” Juan wanted Ernie to have access to the ride-sharing technologies that dominate the startup marketplace today (e.g. Uber and Lyft). They found great validation by tapping into people’s good nature – an uncommon approach for a Startup Weekend team.

Once I announced their second place win, Ernie stood up and made his way to the main stage. With every step, more and more people rose with him and applauded his victory with deafening cheers of support.

Diversity includes everyone. EVERYONE.
Diversity includes everyone. EVERYONE.

When Ernie took the microphone to say how happy he was to have made the difficult trip to attend Startup Weekend, I was indeed full of la pasión as well (i.e. TEARS OF JOY.)

Or when I could not stop smiling when I was presented with this amazing certificate

drama-certificate

The text reads:
“A special recognition for surviving your
MIAMI DRAMA INITIATION
Let all who view this document know you survived Miami. We are diverse, speak at the same time and have a rollercoaster of emotions, but at the end of the day, we’re all family and end the night laughing with J’s (JAJAJAJA). You rock!”

Perhaps I had been a bit of a curmudgeon the whole time…

Yeah, I can be a bit.... yeah.
Yeah, I can be a bit…. yeah.

I was deeply moved by the relentless love I received towards the organizers, who should be named (in no particular order): Paula Celestino, Pia Celestino, Ryan Amsel, Gaby Castelao, and Anas Benadel.

Hey, sponsors! We love you!
Hey, SW Miami sponsors! We love you!

In short, Startup Weekend is indeed a roller coaster (it’s designed that way), but for a small minority, that can be an unpleasant experience. Emotions are meant to run high, but there are ways to keep it balanced yet still exciting.

I hope these suggestions serve as a way to hold someone’s hand to make them feel safe right before they take the deep plunge into entrepreneurship.

Good luck, and thank you, Startup Weekend Miami: Diversity Edition!

Lee Ngo is a community leader based out of Pittsburgh, PA.