Tackling Business Models for EdTech Ventures

What business models work for edtech startups? Great question! Edtech entrepreneurs are on a constant search to identify new business models that work in education. This Monday, Startup Weekend Sacramento, in preparation for our EdTech Edition Startup Weekend May 15-17, is hosting a Business Models in Education workshop that will help you answer this question!

Our workshop will introduce you to current trends in education business models—from K-12 to college to life long learning. You’ll roll up your sleeves and work in a group on a business model canvas and see how innovation impacts all aspects of a business.

You’ll also have the opportunity to see an education entrepreneur’s business on the canvas –our special guest is Janine Yancey, founder and CEO of Emtrain, a successful Sacramento company that focuses on employee education. Janine founded Emtrain to give employees and managers direct access to expert HR and legal guidance and training. Their focus is to help companies develop the workplace skills and ethical decision-making needed to foster an awesome and respectful workplace.

If you’re already registered to attend Startup Weekend EdTech May 15-17 or if you’re just thinking about it, you’ll find this workshop incredibly helpful! The workshop is FREE if you have already registered for Startup Weekend Sacramento EdTech Edition. Check your order confirmation for the promo code or email us. This workshop is open to everyone else for just $3 to cover the printed materials cost. We hope you can join us!

Details:
Business Models in Education
Wednesday April 27 from 6-8 pm
Location: Hacker Lab, 1715 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95811
Cost: $3, free to Startup Weekend registrants
Register Here

Bonus: US Dept of Education just published the Ed Tech Developer’s Guide– an incredible resource for developers and education entrepreneurs. You can download it here.








10 Reasons Why I Had The Time of My Life at Startup Weekend Valencia College Education

During the weekend of April 17th, 2015, I had the honor of being the facilitator for Startup Weekend Valencia College Education, the first ever event that focused exclusively on college-specific educational issues. The event coincided with Orlando Tech Week as well, and I’m blown away by momentum that’s building in their entrepreneurial community.

Below are some of the highlights of my time in O-Town. (Don’t call it that.)

1. Met Gregg Pollack, the founder of Code School

pollack
Total fanboy moment – I’ve watched this guy in countless lessons while in my pajamas. Turns out he’s from my hometown as well and went to high school with my older sister. 20 years later, his online learning site sold for $36 million.

2. Rolled up to the event in a classy ride

One of the organizers insisted on driving me to Valencia College in her BMW convertible with the top down. We drove through the express lanes of Central Florida blasting Maroon 5’s “Sugar” for self-evident reasons.

valencia-head-bob

3. Orlando folk danced like nobody’s watching

Even before the party got started, the organizers and mentors had a rhythm they couldn’t shake.

valencia-dancing

4. …Or danced like everybody’s watching

I’ve been planning this one for weeks: a re-creation of that awesome “walking” scene in the Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars’ “Uptown Funk” music video:

valencia-otownfunk

5. Collected that multi-colored t-shirt swag

valencia-t-shirt

Usually I collect a t-shirt after every event I volunteer at, but #SWValencia decided to give me FOUR different colors: green, blue, red, and gray. My wardrobe is now complete.

6. Hung out with high-energy future entrepreneurs

I generally love it when kids show up to Startup Weekend. They’re full of enthusiasm and don’t cease to think of ways to make the event even more fun.

valencia-kids

The lead organizer‘s son came up with a dance move that looks as if he’s about to chop me in the head. Fortunately, neither of us were injured in the making of this GIF.

valencia-jack-lee

7. Non-stop 3D Printing for everyone

valencia-3d-print

With the support of local organization DeltaMaker, #SWValencia had two printing machines operating throughout the event. The trinkets made were amazing.

valencia-overworked-asian-award

At first I was going to steal this Oscar replica to taunt fellow community leader and NYC living legend Andrew Young, but his response was “how cute.”

IMG_20150419_234401

But it turns out they made one just for me! “That’ll do, Lee, that’ll do.”

valencia-kanye

8. Did I forget to mention how much dancing went on?

That’s right – even faculty and administration came out to participate at #SWValencia, with some of them taking the top prize. Pretty sure there will be some follow-up traction after this event.

9. Hugged as long and often as I could

PhotoGrid_1429491058289

During a break, I had some people watch Simon Sinek’s TED talk on why it’s important to establish physical contact in order to build trust, lower stress levels, and increase cooperation among groups.

(Un)lucky for Valencia, I’m a pretty big fan of hugs. I’ve even removed the detached “bro-hug” from my repertoire because, well, “no half measures,” amirite?

10. Whenever possible, I acted (innocuously) insane.

I’ll leave you with this last image of me that pretty much encapsulates my take on Startup Weekend.

valencia-whirlwind

Thanks for reading my post! Much thanks to organizers Josh Murdock, Jenny Charriez, and Lisa Macon for having me! My next facilitation will be in Tampa Bay for their Youth Edition event in May. If you’re close by (or even if you’re not), you should come out.

I promise to make it the time of your life.

Lee Ngo is an UP Global Community Leader currently based in Pittsburgh, PA. 








Education Entrepreneurs Community Leader Spotlight: Allison Baum

 

Allison Baum

Allison Baum Headshot

One-line bio: I am an Asia-based early stage investor, entrepreneur, and connector.

Find me in…Hong Kong, Tokyo, Bay Area, or on an airplane.

Find me on…

Favorite Twitter Hashtags

Day Job
Managing Director at Fresco Capital, a global early stage venture fund

One-liner, describing your work
We support exceptional entrepreneurs to build remarkable businesses.

What do you like to do for fun?
Watch and talk about films, hiking, yoga, writing, and travel.

How did you discover Education Entrepreneurs?
I was familiar with Startup Weekend, but as I started to work more with our edtech portfolio companies (we have ten), I read about Education Entrepreneurs and immediately knew we had to bring them to Hong Kong.

Allison Baum SW EDU HK

What’s been your involvement in Education Entrepreneurs to date?
I’ve mentored and judged at previous Startup Weekends, I taught a Workshop on Business Models in Education, and most recently organized the first ever Startup Weekend Education in Hong Kong.

What’s the most challenging thing about being an Organizer?
Being a General and Foot Soldier at the same time — you have to think big and enroll various community stakeholders in the community’s vision, in order to make the event a success, but nothing will get done unless you’re also ready to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty to make it happen!

What’s the most rewarding thing about being an Organizer?
Seeing the transformation of the individuals and teams from Friday night to Sunday night.  The first evening, everyone is cautious and tentative. They have ideas but aren’t sure what to do with them.  By Sunday evening, the teams exude a contagious sense of confidence having actually created a solution that didn’t previously exist.

What’s the biggest piece of advice you’d give to those trying to build community?
Really figure out why people are interested in engaging with the community and what they hope to accomplish through their participation.  Everyone has different goals – asking them to share their respective visions of what is possible and encouraging people to work together to make them a reality is a really powerful thing.

What’s the biggest piece of advice you’d give to people trying to create edtech products?
There’s over a million ways in which technology can improve education – it’s an incredibly complex and inefficient sector.  However, if you’re going to build a business, make sure there is a short-term incentive or catalyst for adoption of your product.  Unless you help your customers achieve success according to their immediate metrics for success, you’re simply non-essential.

Allison Baum in SW HK EDU

What’s the legacy you’d like to leave in the education space?
Strong relationships with both our investors and the entrepreneurs we invest in.  As a venture investor, our returns are very important, but good relationships pay dividends over time.

What’s your favorite edtech company or innovative school, and why?
We have ten edtech portfolio companies right now, I can’t possibly pick a favorite!  Check them all out here: http://frescocapital.com/our-companies/

Finish the sentence: In my dream world, education would ____
not only enable individuals to learn at their own pace and in their own way, but also empower them to build their own dynamic roadmap according to their unique strengths and passions.

What are the resources or events that you think anyone interested in innovating in education and/or building community should check out?
Read as much as you can to understand what is happening in the space and start engaging with members of the community outside of your immediate geography. Set up Google alerts for “ed tech”, check out Edsurge, participate in an Education Entrepreneurs meet up in another city!

 

More about Education Entrepreneurs

Education Entrepreneurs is the largest initiative in the world focused on helping people use entrepreneurship to improve education. Its suite of offerings include Startup Weekend Education, Startup Digest Education, Workshops, online resources, and a global network of Community Leaders. Spanning six continents, Education Entrepreneurs has created an unprecedented opportunity for anyone, anywhere to shape the future of education.

 








11 Brilliant Best Practices at Startup Weekend Education NYC

As a first-time facilitator for the 4th installment of Startup Weekend Education New York City (@SWNYCEDU, #NYCEDU), I was both literally and figuratively taken to school.

Led by the incomparable Deborah Chang, the well-synced and ragtag organizational team of David Fu, Benjamin Newton, Laura Patterson, and Ingrid Spielman (with community leader Andrew Young as advisor) delivered a sold-out, knock-out event on May 27th.

Let the games begin. (You can't read that without hearing the Bane voice.)
Let the games begin. (You can’t read that without hearing the Bane voice.)

In between real-talk mentoring and the occasional selfie, I took many mental notes about some best practices I saw at SWNYCEDU that I think should be replicated across all SWEDU events, if not Startup Weekend itself.

For your consideration:

1. Hold the event at a school, but in an open area

It’s a common understand that a SWEDU event (or Startup Weekend in general) should take place in a school – plenty of whiteboards, space, breakout rooms, and common areas. If teams are all in classrooms, however, they won’t interact with each other as much, which inhibits the core purpose of building community.

Wide open spaces. (Dixie Chicks serious.)
Wide open spaces. (Dixie Chicks serious.)

SWNYCEDU put most of the teams out in a common area, giving each station a huge whiteboards, sufficient tables, and open spaces to roam and float to other teams. The result: a willingness to share and collaborate that supersedes the spirit of competition.

2. Give out lanyards with ALL of the FAQ information you’ll need

“What’s the wifi password, again?”
“What’s the Twitter hashtag for this event?”
“How do I know you’re actually supposed to be here?”

I'm so excited to be wearing a lanyard that I'm practically crooning.
I’m so excited to be wearing a lanyard that I’m practically crooning.

Not a problem when it’s hanging around your neck at all times. Key information is great to have, and it’s also a reusable, standardized way to maintain formality and security at the event.

3. Use a text-messaging app to send out alerts

More compelling than email or social media, texting gets people’s attention faster and adds another method of outreach to a crowd of focused, stressed-out participants.

Alternatively, we could have Ben do this to all 100+ participants. Fun to watch, but not efficient.
Alternatively, we could have Ben do this to all 100+ participants. Fun to watch, but not efficient.

4. Provide advance information and office hours signups for mentors

Figuring out how to coordinate members seemed like an impossible art to me, but this group worked it out well by creating a station for teams to review and request mentors.

Mentors are perhaps the most valuable resource at any Startup Weekend event. Choose, but choose wisely.
Mentors are perhaps the most valuable resource at any Startup Weekend event.

Coaches were asked to come at specific times, and teams sign up to meet with them on a first-come, first-serve basis. This eased confusion greatly for everyone.

5. Provide 3 phases of mentoring: brainstorm, focus, and presentation

Traditionally in other Startup Weekends, mentors pop in an event at various, even unpredictable times, and sometimes their advice does not mesh well with the team’s general progress. Some are already validated and advanced, and some are still searching for that “thing.”

Ben and I brainstorm with one of the participants.
Ben and I brainstorm with one of the participants.

SWNYCEDU takes these variations into account and brings in mentors during Saturday morning and afternoon strictly for brainstorm and validation.

SWEDU_2015_20
Deborah and a volunteer listen and provide feedback.

In the evening, they bring in mentors (usually Startup Weekend veterans) who aim to provide focus after a long day of retaining multiple opinions and ideas.

Team Wizart practices their pitch.
Team Wizart practices their pitch.

By Sunday, SWNYCEDU brings in coaches who specialize specifically in pitch practice and communication, not business content or validation. This overall strategy gives teams a bit more structure and clarity as they evolve their ideas into bona fide companies.

6. Use Google Slides to present pitches seamlessly…

Simply put, there are far too many different ways to present at a Startup Weekend. Teams tend to present off their own laptops and switch back and forth between operating systems and format. In my opinion, this is a clunky and volatile process.

I've got a fever, and the only prescription... is Google Slides.
I’ve got a fever, and the only prescription… is Google Slides.

SWNYCEDU had one computer for the entire presentation setup, so they used a single format (Google Slides) and uploaded everything into the cloud. A huge amount time was saved overall between transitions.

7. … make teams do web demos (and tech check in advance)…

Tech Check is a rough job, yet vital to the success of your event. Make sure you run it right.
Tech Check is a rough job, yet vital to the success of your event. Make sure you run it right.

Doing live demos are traditionally considered a big risk at Startup Weekend – technical failures are perhaps forgiven but not forgotten. With only one computer for all 13 presentations, all demos also had to be sent up to the cloud and tested by 3pm.

8. … and put links to both decks and demos in a single Google Doc

A little embarrassing backstory: Startup Weekenders should always consider Murphy’s Law – whatever can happen will happen. This happened to me when I foolishly opened up every single presentation and demo into a single web browser and, to no one with a basic understanding of IT, crashed the system.

How I was feeling during that stressful 20-minute tech reboot.
How I was feeling during that stressful 20-minute tech reboot.

Organizer David Fu stepped up in a huge way to reboot the system and put all of the links to the slides, demos, and videos in a chronologically organized Google Doc. Once everything was back in order, the process went smoothly. Despite the 20-minute technical delay, we finished the event on time.

9. Serve dinner while the judges deliberate

As a past organizer and volunteer, I’ve never known what to do with the judges deliberation period. Dinner usually is served after presentations are submitted, and in the past I’ve seen ways to pass the time such as Community Asks or some light video or entertainment.

Finally, a moment to relax in a 54-hour maelstrom.
Finally, a moment to relax in a 54-hour maelstrom.

Serving dinner gets people to talk across teams, offer congratulations, and take their minds off the anxious decision that awaits them. Good food placates all.

10. Make animated GIFs of yourselves whenever possible

Taking on a new initiative that gets communities also doing Startup Weekends simultaneously, we made some fun little animated images for our friends in D.C., who held a Maker-themed event of their own. I think this speaks for itself.

nyclovesdc
Nothing but love for #SWDCMaker. Photo generated by Laura Patterson with GIFMe!

If only we made more… Andrew Young, I’m looking right at you.

Finally, and most importantly of all:

11. Have a team that puts vision, guests, and team above ego

I can’t say enough wonderful things about Team SWNYCEDU. There was not an iota of attitude among any of them. When things went right, they showered each other with support and praise. When things went wrong, they responded to the problems with solutions rather than stand around and point fingers.

What a terrific team and Startup Weekend community!
What a terrific team and Startup Weekend community!

On top of that, they were an absolute pleasure to work with. I laughed at Laura and Ingrid’s wry jokes, felt secure by Ben and Deborah’s unflinching professionalism, and may have found some long-lost cousins in Fu and Young. You couldn’t buy a better team than this one – they’ll do it all for free.

In short, I learned a lot at Startup Weekend Education New York City. I hope you’ve learned a lot by reading this, too. Can’t wait to come back next year… perhaps as a participant? =)

Lee Ngo was the facilitator of Startup Weekend Education New York and is a Regional Manager at UP Global, the parent organization of Startup Weekend. To learn more about UP Global and its efforts to spread the spirit of entrepreneurship throughout the world, you can email him at lee@up.co.

To reach out or get involved with the Startup Weekend New York City community, reach out to nyc@startupweekend.org or nycedu@startupweekend.org specifically to contact the SWNYCEDU organizers.

Photos from this event courtesy of Frank Fukuchi and the organizers and volunteers of Startup Weekend New York City. All rights reserved. 

More about Education Entrepreneurs

Education Entrepreneurs is the largest initiative in the world focused on helping people use entrepreneurship to improve education. Its suite of offerings include Startup Weekend Education, Startup Digest Education, Workshops, online resources, and a global network of Community Leaders. Spanning six continents, Education Entrepreneurs has created an unprecedented opportunity for anyone, anywhere to shape the future of education.








3 Teaching Tips I Learned At SXSWEdu

Written by Gerson Ribeiro, an Education Entrepreneurs Community Leader in Recife, Brazil.

My first time at SXSWedu in Austin, TX was simply mind-blowing! I had the honor of being there and even better, I got a chance to stay at the HQ of Education Entrepreneurs with five other amazing people that were focused on engaging around the topic of education.

The keynotes, panels, and after-parties were both fun and informative. SXSWEdu is the perfect event for learning more about edtech, education innovation, and the trends that will change how we learn and teach.

Here are three key things I learned there that I’m excited to share with you:

1) Kids must learn how to code

One trend that is not exactly new, but everybody is talking about, is the importance to teach kids how to code. I believe that coding is being emphasized for two reasons: 1) the computing industry is growing and we need to prepare our kids for these jobs, and 2) programming makes the brain connect things better and more systematically.

At SXSWEdu there was a presentation by Matt Venn and his presentation focused on three topics:

  • How to teach computing without a computer
  • How to teach programming without code
  • How to teach computing without being boring

I was really impressed by his titles and was amazed by the time he finished the presentation. As a university programming student, I thought it would never be possible to teach computing without a computer or without coding. Matt’s presentation showed me that it’s very simple to do all of that with kids by using different approaches to programming besides just going to the keyboard and typing everything.

First, he made us understand that coding is really about the logics behind it. Logics and parameters are easy to understand and are applicable for everything in our world. His example was to ask for a blindfolded person to move from one place to the other.

Of course this is difficult with obstacles, so we had to devise some basic instructions, like walk a limited number of steps, define the size of each step, turn right or left 90 degrees and stop. This may sound silly but basic programming could be something like that:

  • define step = size of your foot;
  • start:
  • walk straight ahead for 20 steps;
  • turn left_90_degrees;
  • walk straight ahead for 5 steps;
  • turn right_90_degrees;
  • stop

Kids would easily understand these basic concepts and then you would go further into coding by introducing other real-life activities to teach them more about the logics behind it.

That was a lot of fun to do! If you are a teacher you should try it!

2) Bring Hollywood to class

New research and different experiments show us that we can’t just teach kids in a passive way. We need to motivate them to be curious, active and go learn by themselves. One very interesting approach was shown at SXSWEdu by using different aspects from Hollywood, video games, and storytelling.

At the Playground Talks & Hands-On (an awesome place where you learn by doing), we had the privilege to engage in an activity hosted by Allan Staker. There, around 10 adults were on a quest to find a missing researcher that was solving a very important mystery.

By using different elements, like Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey, we were involved in solving the whole mystery behind the story by learning trigonometry, geography, history, and other things. We also got a free compass! Yay!!!

The main idea is to bring the students to a journey that has mystery, drama, and action. A journey where they are active characters, and their job is to solve whatever the mission requests of them. This is an interesting approach, but also a little tricky, because the teacher must find new ways to teach the same curriculum but embedded inside the context of the story.

Storytelling is very important, and structuring an exciting story is key to success.

Maybe very soon we are going to be seeing some RPG games with quests that include some math problem solving and biology research embedded in it. We’ll see!

3) We don’t know (yet) which model is the best: Old vs New

I’ve been working to innovate education for a while now and meeting Brian Greenberg from Silicon Schools was simply an honor. The guy is amazing. So amazing, in fact, that I could not have imagined that there would be somebody willing to confront him on a public panel, fervently defending traditional schooling. (For those of you who don’t know, Brian is an advocate for new school models). That was before I met Anthony Kim, the super smart CEO of Education Elements. They were in a battle to defend their points of view during the panel School Models: Tried and True vs. Shiny and New.

Heather Staker was responsible for mediating the conversation and made it even more rich by asking very difficult questions.

While Brian was defending how we can develop new and innovative schools by using different methods, Anthony brought the traditional point of view for solutions in education.

For us in the audience, it was really interesting to see these two points of view being discussed at the same time. Is the old school model so bad after all? Are these brand new learning methods going to really work in the long run?

One thing’s for sure, this is a debate that will go on for a long time.

 

More about Education Entrepreneurs

Education Entrepreneurs is the largest initiative in the world focused on helping people use entrepreneurship to improve education. Its suite of offerings include Startup Weekend Education, Startup Digest Education, Workshops, online resources, and a global network of Community Leaders. Spanning six continents, Education Entrepreneurs has created an unprecedented opportunity for anyone, anywhere to shape the future of education.








A Resource List Every Edtech Entrepreneur Should Have

This post was updated on April 13, 2015

This list was compiled for a presentation I gave at a conference last month focused on building an edtech venture in the United States. It’s meant to be a brief synopsis of some of the key steps you should take, as well as some of the key players you should know about. If you find it helpful, leave a comment saying so. If you think important items are missing, please share them. Hopefully this can be something we all contribute to, in order to create a more comprehensive list of resources and opportunities that edtech entrepreneurs can benefit from.

Note: Edsurge, Imagine K12, and 4.0 Schools are official partners of Education Entrepreneurs

Screen-Shot-2015-04-13-at-7.25.52-PM Screen-Shot-2015-04-13-at-7.44.02-PM Screen-Shot-2015-04-13-at-7.26.29-PM Screen-Shot-2015-04-13-at-7.26.50-PM Screen-Shot-2015-04-13-at-7.27.00-PM

If you liked this article, you may also like 5 Things You Can Do at Startup Weekend Education That You Can’t Do Anywhere Else

More about Education Entrepreneurs

Education Entrepreneurs is the largest initiative in the world focused on helping people use entrepreneurship to improve education. Its suite of offerings include Startup Weekend Education, Startup Digest Education, Workshops, online resources, and a global network of Community Leaders. Spanning six continents, Education Entrepreneurs has created an unprecedented opportunity for anyone, anywhere to shape the future of education.

 

 








Community Leader Spotlight: Hiro Miyakawa

ef8433bfc04795583e98be0a3ab8fe2dHiro Miyakawa is half Japanese/half Brazilian. He is 24-years-old and believes curiosity and learning is the essence of humanity and love.

Miyakawa is a Startup Weekend Education Organizer and the Founder of Kotobá, a connector of  students to engaging Japanese language lessons.

Find him on Twitter: @hrxm
Using his favorite hashtag: #go
Or on the web: kotoba.com.brabout.me/hrxm

 

***Read about Miyakawa’s Startup Weekend Edu Youth Recife event. For the first time, outside the US, young people set up educational startups in 54 hours.

——

What do you like to do for fun?
Watch tv shows, read books, talk, and travel. Try and do exciting things: Cook, surf, play, standup comedy.

If you could have any teacher (dead or alive, real or fictional) who would it be and why?

Nelson Mandela. He engaged people to make a better country. The humbleness he had when he left the prison and thanked the guard, the determination he had to be against the values of that time…. I have many things to learn from him.

What’s your favorite edtech company and/or innovative school, and why?

Udemy. It’s simple, practical, and skill-focused learning.

How did you discover Education Entrepreneurs (EE)?

After my first Startup Weekend, I was hooked. I talked to Gerson about it and we started Organizing one in Recife.

What’s been your involvement in EE to date?

Organized SWEdu Recife and SWEdu Youth Recife, meetups and talks.

What’s the most challenging thing about being an Organizer (and/or Facilitator)?Finding Sponsors.

What’s the most rewarding thing about being an Organizer (and/or Facilitator)?
Seeing that I’m part of change and making the world better place! People leave the event empowered and talking about next steps. That’s fantastic!

What’s the biggest piece of advice you would give to those trying to build an education innovation community?

Engage with schools, teachers, professors, policy makers. They often don’t feel part of the entrepreneur world as devs and designers do. We have to make educators comfortable and communicate that they are the key people that will making things happen.

What’s the biggest piece of advice you would give to people trying to create edtech products?

User experience is important. Engaging students to learn smoothly is the challenge in this mobile and internet world. It’s getting accessible, easy-learning, almost free, so the business model is challenging too.

You just launched the first ever SWEDU Youth Edition outside of the United States – congrats! Why did you decide to do it?

Youths are often excluded from entrepreneurship. “Too soon, too young” is the same excuse. We wanted to include them, hear them and challenge them to build educational solutions. There’s no convention that holds them back, and we wanted to see where all that creativity would take us.

What’s different about a SWEDU Youth Edition than a regular SWEDU?

In SWEDU Youth has step-by-step workshops. The kids don’t know pitches, costumer validation, etc. So we have to teach them in a practical way. Also, dedicated mentors make a huge difference. They act as godparents, guiding the kids through the whole weekend.

For those Organizers who may want to do a SWEDU Youth Edition in their community, what are the three biggest pieces of advice you’d give them?

  • The role of mentors is SUPER important. They stay together with the kids the whole time, they’ll be dedicated coaches.
  • Finding mentors that not only understand business and education but also is great with kids.
  • Having a consolidated school as partner is great to have trust from parents (and help approach the attendees’ parents)

What’s the legacy you want to leave in education?

Accessible and high-quality learning for everyone. We have technology to make it possible! I don’t wanna see a single person not taking a chance of his life because he didn’t have the opportunity to learn something.

Finish the sentence: In my dream world, education would ____
be fun and engaging for everyone.

What are the books, events, videos, etc. that you think anyone interested in innovating in education and/or building community should check out?

Books:
Lean Startup
Business Model Canvas
Startup Communities
The Little Prince

Events:
Meetups (organize one!)
TEDx

Videos:
TED Talk Sir Ken Robinson “School kills creativity”
TED Talk Jeff Skoll “My journey into movies that matters”
TED Talk Jane McGonigal “Gaming can make a better world”

Anything else you’d like to share?
I’m really happy to be part of the EE community and help things happen here in Brazil. Being an Organizer at Startup Weekend Education is really enriching, it’s an honor to help people feel empowered by entrepreneurship. It’s a huge learning each time. We have lots of challenges to overcome in education but one thing is sure, we’re not alone. Peace 🙂








UP Montreal: Learn How To Launch and Scale Your EdTech Venture

EDU, EdTech, Startup Weekend Education, Montreal, Canada
EDU, EdTech, Startup Weekend Education, Montreal, Canada

Education Entrepreneurs Workshops launched during the summer of 2014 and have already spread to three continents: North America, Europe, and Asia. In Canada, fellow UP Montreal community leaders Noor El Bawab, Diana Cheptene, Marek Zaluski, Charles Gedeon and Mirjam Sulger organized the first one in the Province of Quebec.

To know more about the EdTech community in Montreal, join them in Linkedin or Facebook.

Workshops help you teach key education entrepreneurship skills to your community. We provide you with all the materials, so you’re well equipped to create a valuable experience. You can either host a workshop 1-3 weeks before a Startup Weekend Education event, or as a stand-alone event any time during the year.

Education Entrepreneurs – Workshop – Montreal – Canada – McGill University – Summer 2014

If you are passionate about education innovation, learn the foundational skills you need to launch and scale an edtech venture at a workshop near you

Education Entrepreneurs Workshops are two hours of engaging instruction, quality guest speakers, and hands-on activities designed for an audience of about 50 people. The two Workshop topics we offer so far are:

  1. Edtech Business Models, and
  2. Customer Development and Empathy in Education.

If you’d like to bring an Education Entrepreneurs Workshop to Montrealapply here!

aspireedu1

If you’d like to organize a Startup Weekend Education edition in Montreal, apply here!

Startup Weekend Education gives you the unique opportunity to show people in your community how to launch a startup in just one weekend. Coming together on Friday night to pitch ideas, participants from a variety of fields (e.g. educators, students, developers, designers) quickly form teams and spend the next 54 hours working together to build innovative solutions to important education problems. 








Cengage Learning transformando a experiência de aprendizagem

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A Cengage Learning é uma empresa líder em conteúdos, tecnologias e serviços educacionais para os ensinos nos níveis básico e fundamental (K-12), e também superior, além de atender mercados profissionais e bibliotecários em todo o mundo. A empresa oferece conteúdos, serviços personalizados e soluções digitais orientados aos cursos que aceleram o envolvimento dos alunos e transformam a experiência de aprendizagem. Com sede em Boston (MA), a Cengage Learning opera em mais de 20 países ao redor do mundo, inclusive no Brasil. Para mais informações, acesse www.cengage.com.br ou visite nossos perfis nas mídias sociais: Facebook, Twitter @CengageBrasil ou @cengagelatina.








Community Leader Spotlight: Deborah Chang

 
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One-line bio

I am an educator and entrepreneur.

Find me in…

New York City

Find me on…

LinkedIn | Twitter | The Huffington Post

Favorite Twitter Hashtag
#nycedu

Website
www.debryc.com

Day Job
Co-Founder, Nexus Works

One-liner, describing your work
I support early stage education companies entering the NYC market by consulting on their product, organization design, and business development strategy.

What you like to do for fun?
This weekend, I went rock climbing, read a book about dragons, and went on a scavenger hunt. Basically, the more adventurous the activity, the better. I also have a slightly unhealthy obsession with Reddit.

How did you discover Education Entrepreneurs?
Nihal ElRayess organized an Idea Competition for Teach For America corps members and alumni. The winners were sponsored to attend a Startup Weekend Education in the Bay Area. Because of her, my startup idea partner, Jamie Lonie, and I were able to pitch and lead a team at that Startup Weekend Education. I think that experience for completely changing my life and giving me an opportunity to meet my first mentors in the education innovation space.

What’s been your involvement in Education Entrepreneurs to date?
I’m a three-time Organizer of Startup Weekend NYCEDU. Join us if you can on March 27th for the fourth annual event!

What’s the most challenging thing about being an Organizer?
I feel the pressure to ensure that each event is as well-organized as it possibly can be.

What’s the most rewarding thing about being an Organizer?
I know that I’m changing lives every time I organize an event. It’s a fantastic feeling.

What’s the biggest piece of advice you’d give to those trying to build community?
Find good people, establish common purpose, and do excellent work. Community is but the sum of the micro interactions that come from these three things.

What’s the biggest piece of advice you’d give to people trying to create edtech products?
Solve for a real pain point. It’s the big problems that need solutions. So find a problem worth solving and the team capable of solving it, and you’ll be 90% of the way there.

What’s the legacy you’d like to leave in the education space?
I’d like to look back and see a thriving education community that believes in “give before you get,” children first, and collaborative problem solving. 

What’s your favorite edtech company or innovative school, and why?
I started my teaching career at KIPP Academy Middle School in Houston, Texas. It is a school filled with people who are simply exemplary human beings, and their love for the children in their care permeates every interaction. The belief I have in the power of education to change the world comes directly from my experience in the halls and classrooms of KIPP Academy.

Finish the sentence: In my dream world, education would ____
…be accessible to every child so that he or she can make the most of his or her inborn potential.

What are the resources or events that you think anyone interested in innovating in education and/or building community should check out?
Check out the Nexus Works Professional Development Board to see our recommend readings and videos. Principles from these books form the core of what we do!

Anything else you’d like to share?
If you’re someone who’s looking to move into education technology, take the leap! There are all sorts of ways to get involved, from within the classroom to outside. While this post — Help! I’m a Teacher…How Do I Get Into Education Technology? — was written for teachers, it can be just as applicable to you. Take a look, and, good luck!

 

More about Education Entrepreneurs

Education Entrepreneurs is the largest initiative in the world focused on helping people use entrepreneurship to improve education. Its suite of offerings include Startup Weekend Education, Startup Digest Education, Workshops, online resources, and a global network of Community Leaders. Spanning six continents, Education Entrepreneurs has created an unprecedented opportunity for anyone, anywhere to shape the future of education.